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‘The October Man’ excels with the right man in actor John Mills

The October Man

Written by Eric Ambler

Directed by Roy Ward Baker

U.K., 1947

Jim Ackland (John Mills) is riding the bus with his niece one dark and stormy night. The vehicle is filled to the brim with passengers, some fast asleep, others enjoying time with their loved ones. Fate sees that Jim’s life is turned upside down however, as a mechanical failure sends the bus off track, crashing into a wall. The last thing Jim recalls before blacking out is the harrowing horn of an oncoming train. Months later, Jim is finally relieved from his hospital stay, although warned by the doctor that his recovery from the fracture in his skull will require time, and that he may even experience difficult episodes of relapse. Confident that things are on the mend, Jim rents a hotel room as his new living quarters and finds employment at a nearby chemical lab.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Kent on Marilyn: 'a totally insignificant little blonde' off-screen

Jean Kent: ‘The Browning Version’ 1951, Gainsborough folds (photo: Jean Kent in ‘The Browning Version,’ with Michael Redgrave) (See previous post: “Jean Kent: Gainsborough Pictures Film Star Dead at 92.”) Seemingly stuck in Britain, Jean Kent’s other important leads of the period came out in 1948: John Paddy CarstairsAlfred Hitchcock-esque thriller Sleeping Car to Trieste (1948), with spies on board the Orient Express, and Gordon Parry’s ensemble piece Bond Street. Following two minor 1950 comedies, Her Favorite Husband / The Taming of Dorothy and The Reluctant Widow / The Inheritance, Kent’s movie stardom was virtually over, though she would still have one major film role in store. In what is probably her best remembered and most prestigious effort, Jean Kent played Millie Crocker-Harris, the unsympathetic, adulterous wife of unfulfilled teacher Michael Redgrave, in Anthony Asquith’s 1951 film version of Terence Rattigan’s The Browning Version — a Javelin Films production
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Brief Encounter' beats 'Casablanca' to top romantic film

'Brief Encounter' beats 'Casablanca' to top romantic film
Brief Encounter has beaten Casablanca to the title of 'Best Romantic Film' in a new list for Time Out London.

The list was compiled with input from 101 industry experts, including actor Richard Gere, directors Judd Apatow and Edgar Wright, and Miss Piggy of The Muppets.

> Read the full top 100 on the 'Time Out' website

Time Out London's film editor Dave Calhoun said: "What makes the Time Out list so exciting and unusual is that it's not just the opinion of three sun-starved film critics sitting in a darkened room and writing a list.

"Instead, we got off our sofas and asked 101 real experts in movies and romance for their personal take on the matter - and our top 100 romantic films reflects their very personal choices."

Topping the list was David Lean's 1946 drama Brief Encounter, written by Noël Coward and starring Celia Johnson, Trevor Howard, Stanley Holloway and Joyce Carey.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Brief Encounter Review – Celia Johnson, Trevor Howard – d: David Lean

Brief Encounter (1945) Direction: David Lean Cast: Celia Johnson, Trevor Howard, Stanley Holloway, Joyce Carey, Cyril Raymond Screenplay: David Lean, Ronald Neame, Anthony Havelock-Allan; from Noel Coward's play Still Life Oscar Movies Highly Recommended Celia Johnson, Trevor Howard, Brief Encounter Synopsis: A married doctor (Trevor Howard) and a housewife (Celia Johnson) have an adulterous (and platonic) affair. The Pros: Shadow-bathed, smoke-enshrouded railway stations (cinematography by Robert Krasker) to the strains of Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 2. Enough to turn the jadedest among us into a wide-eyed romantic. David Lean's delicate, compassionate direction; and Lean, Ronald Neame, and Anthony Havelock-Allan's sensitive adaptation of Noel Coward's play Still Life. No Hollywood ending here, and no syrupy, cutesy moments, either. Just as important, neither the director nor the screenwriters are ever either judgmental or condescending toward their characters. Best Actress Oscar nominee and New York Film Critics winner Celia Johnson's
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Brief Encounter: the best romantic film of all time

David Lean, 1945

In how many other countries would a poll pick Brief Encounter as the best movie romance of all time? Even in Britain, I wonder how many people born since, say, 1975 would rate it so highly. But for a generation that remembers when the trains ran on time and station buffets were as tidy and inviting as the one in this movie, Brief Encounter is etched in nostalgia for an era when trapped middle-class lives contemplated adultery but set the disturbing thought aside. On the face of it, it would seem that Britain has changed; but is it possible that the David Lean-Noël Coward film is still the model for repressed feelings as an English ideal? We are accustomed to attributing films to directors, but it's only proper to regard Coward as an equal author of this movie. He wrote the script, taking it from his own one-act play,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Brief Encounter: No 1

David Lean, 1945

In how many other countries would a poll pick Brief Encounter as the best movie romance of all time? Even in Britain, I wonder how many people born since, say, 1975 would rate it so highly. But for a generation that remembers when the trains ran on time and station buffets were as tidy and inviting as the one in this movie, Brief Encounter is etched in nostalgia for an era when trapped middle-class lives contemplated adultery but set the disturbing thought aside. On the face of it, it would seem that Britain has changed; but is it possible that the David Lean-Noël Coward film is still the model for repressed feelings as an English ideal? We are accustomed to attributing films to directors, but it's only proper to regard Coward as an equal author of this movie. He wrote the script, taking it from his own one-act play,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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