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Today in Soap Opera History (July 15)

1968: Agnes Nixon's One Life to Live premiered on ABC."History speaks to artists. It changes the artist's thinking and is constantly reshaping it into different and unexpected images."

Anselm Kiefer

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1940: On The Guiding Light, Rose Kransky (Ruth Bailey) and Charles Cunningham had dinner together after a chance meeting on the street.

The episode opened with the following narration: "Where we are free to act, we are also free to refrain from acting. And where we are able to say no, we are also able to say yes. And yet it seems so strange that so many times what we will to be,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

All About Eve – Fasten Your Seatbelts, it’s Going to be a Bumpy Night at The Tivoli Monday!

“Bill’s thirty-two. He looks thirty-two. He looked it five years ago, he’ll look it twenty years from now. I hate men. “

All About Eve plays at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in St. Louis) Monday July 15th as part of the ‘Classics on the Loop’ series. Showtimes are 4pm and 7pm. Admission is $7.

A publicity still from the 1950 Academy Award®-winning drama “All about Eve” features (left to right): Gary Merrill, Bette Davis, George Sanders, Anne Baxter, Hugh Marlowe and Celeste Holm. “All about Eve” received a record 14 Academy Award nominations and won six Oscars®, including Best Picture. Restored by Nick & jane for Dr. Macro’s High Quality Movie Scans Website: http:www.doctormacro.com. Enjoy!

It is almost impossible to find fault in the performances in

All About Eve . Bette Davis is in her element as Margo Channing and Anne Baxter is great as the cunning, if not slightly deranged,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Snake Pit

Hollywood takes a hard look at the mundane horrors of mental asylums, and Olivia de Havilland scores another career high with her portrayal of a housewife experiencing a nervous breakdown. Some people found the show scary and a few felt it was tasteless, but Ms. de Havilland’s performance is riveting, 71 years later. Anatole Litvak’s intense direction makes good use of expressionistic visual devices, without veering into dippy Salvador Dalí psycho-surrealism.

The Snake Pit

Region B Blu-ray

Powerhouse Indicator

1948 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 108 min. / Street Date April 22, 2019 / available from Powerhouse Films UK / £15.99

Starring: Olivia de Havilland, Mark Stevens, Leo Genn, Celeste Holm, Glenn Langan, Helen Craig, Leif Erickson, Beulah Bondi, Lee Patrick, Natalie Schafer, Ruth Donnelly, Katherine Locke, Minna Gombell, Ann Doran, Jacqueline deWit, Betsy Blair, Queenie Smith, Virginia Brissac, Marie Blake, Isabel Jewell, Celia Lovsky, Mae Marsh, Doro Merande, Mary Newton, Inez Palange, Mary Treen, Minerva Urecal.

Cinematography:
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Will ‘The Favourite’ be the lucky 13th film to win Best Supporting Actress for one of two nominees?

Will ‘The Favourite’ be the lucky 13th film to win Best Supporting Actress for one of two nominees?
Since the supporting acting awards were introduced at the 9th Oscars in 1937, 34 films have pitted two featured actresses against each other. The latest of these is “The Favourite,” with both Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz vying for Best Supporting Actress at the 2019 Academy Awards. Both women already have Oscars on their mantles. Weisz won this same category 13 years ago for “The Constant Gardener” while Stone collected the Best Actress prize for “La La Land” two years ago.

Weisz has the edge over Stone in that she is coming off a win at the BAFTA Awards. However, to collect her bookend Oscar, she will have to get past Regina King (“If Beale Street Could Talk”) who has led this race all awards season long. That made her snub by the BAFTAs even more of a puzzle.

If either Weisz or Stone prevail they will be defying not just this year’s odds but Oscar history.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Double Supporting Actress Oscar nominations for ‘The Favourite’: Will Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone vote-split?

Double Supporting Actress Oscar nominations for ‘The Favourite’: Will Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone vote-split?
While it is a common complaint that there aren’t enough good roles for women in films nowadays, “The Favourite” had the reverse problem in that it had almost too many good roles for actresses. The film offers Oscar caliber roles for three performers as it tells the tale of Queen Anne and two women who compete to be her “favourite.” The film inspired a lot of debate in the early days of the Oscar derby as to what categories the film would campaign its three actresses. Ultimately it was decided to place Olivia Colman in Best Actress and Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz in Best Supporting Actress. All three were nominated, thus placing Stone and Weisz in direct competition with each other. In taking a look back on Oscar history since the supporting categories were introduced at the 9th ceremony, are Stone and Weisz in danger of splitting the vote?
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Oscars made history 70 years ago with the first foreign Best Picture winner

The Oscars made history 70 years ago with the first foreign Best Picture winner
The first 15 years of the Academy Awards were banquet held at various swanky hotels in Los Angeles from the Blossom Room at the Hollywood Roosevelt, the Cocoanut Grove and Fiesta Room at the Ambassador and the Sala D’Doro and the Biltmore Bowl at the Biltmore.

Because the ceremony had grown in attendance and importance, the Oscars finally graduated its 16thyear on March 2, 1944 moving to the Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, which then had a capacity of 2,258.

When the ranks of academy members grew two-fold, the Oscars moved to the Shrine Auditorium for the 19thand 20thceremonies. The Shrine was so big-it holds 6,700 seats-the general public was even invited to buy tickets.

But everything changed with the 21stceremony which took place on March 24, 1949. The studio decided to withdraw financial support for the Academy Awards “in order to remove rumors that they had been trying to exert their influence on votes,” explained Robert
See full article at Gold Derby »

Don’t despair Ethan Hawke, the Oscars keep the faith

Don’t despair Ethan Hawke, the Oscars keep the faith
Ethan Hawke is this awards’ season critical darling earning several best actor nods from critic’s groups including the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn. and New York Film Critics Circle for his powerful performance as a troubled clergyman haunted with his past and the future in Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed.”

Hawke, who also won the Gotham Awards honor for best actor, is also nominated for a Critics Choice and a Film Independent Spirit Award but was snubbed in the Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award nominations.

But Hawke, who has received four previously Oscar nominations including for supporting actor for 2014’s “Boyhood,” shouldn’t give up the faith about a fifth nomination. Over the years, the academy has embraced actors and actresses who played members of the clergy with six wins and upwards of two dozen nominations.

Predict the Oscar nominations now; change them until January 22

Both Spencer Tracy
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’
This article marks Part 3 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a pair of prizes among the top races.

At the 4th Academy Awards ceremony, “Cimarron” (1931) made Oscar history as the first motion picture to ever score nominations in the Big Five categories. On the big night, the western took home the top prize in Best Picture, as well as the Oscar in Best Adapted Screenplay (Howard Estabrook). Not as successful were the picture’s director, Wesley Ruggles, topped by Norman Taurog (“Skippy”), and the leads,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Streetcar Named Desire,’ ‘On the Waterfront’

  • Gold Derby
Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Streetcar Named Desire,’ ‘On the Waterfront’
Elia Kazan would have celebrated his 109th birthday on September 7, 2018. Years after his death in 2003, the two-time Oscar-winning director remains both an influential and controversial figure, respected and reviled in equal measure. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Kazan started his career as a stage actor, soon transitioning into directing. He mounted several landmark productions, including the original run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Throughout his career he received three Tony awards for Best Director of a Play: “All My Sons” in 1947, “Death of a Salesman” in 1949, and “J.B.” in 1959.

He transitioned into filmmaking with “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” (1945). Two years later, he won his first Oscar for Best Director for “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), which also took home Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm). A taboo-shattering drama about antisemitism, the film established
See full article at Gold Derby »

Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Elia Kazan would have celebrated his 109th birthday on September 7, 2018. Years after his death in 2003, the two-time Oscar-winning director remains both an influential and controversial figure, respected and reviled in equal measure. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Kazan started his career as a stage actor, soon transitioning into directing. He mounted several landmark productions, including the original run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Throughout his career he received three Tony awards for Best Director of a Play: “All My Sons” in 1947, “Death of a Salesman” in 1949, and “J.B.” in 1959.

He transitioned into filmmaking with “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” (1945). Two years later, he won his first Oscar for Best Director for “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), which also took home Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm). A taboo-shattering drama about antisemitism, the film established
See full article at Gold Derby »

Today in Soap Opera History (July 15)

1968: Agnes Nixon's One Life to Live premiered on ABC."All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity that the dry, shrivelled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of cracking the nut."

Anne Brontë in "Agnes Grey"

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1940: On The Guiding Light, Rose Kransky (Ruth Bailey) and Charles Cunningham had dinner together after a chance meeting on the street.

The episode opened with the following narration: "Where we are free to act, we are also free to refrain from acting. And where we are able to say no, we
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Richard Barclay NYC Tribute Show to Feature Soap Opera Legends Eileen Fulton & Ilene Kristen

In October, the entertainment industry lost a powerful friend, Richard Barclay, a celebrated singer/actor and producer/director who passed away after an eight-month battle with pancreatic cancer. On May 26, Richard Skipper is presenting a celebration of Barclay's life and reuniting two soap opera legends in the progress. The Richard Barclay Memorial show will feature Frank Basile, Julie Budd, Eileen Fulton, Richard Holbrook, Ilene Kristen sharing memories and musical entertainment, led by musical director Rolf Barnes.

The Saturday night show will start at 8 p.m. at Don't Tell Mama in New York (343 W 46th St). There is a $25.00 cover charge and a 2 drink minimum per person. Proceeds will benefit Career Bridges. Reservations can by made after 4 p.m. daily at (212) 757-0788 after 4 Pm or online at donttellmamanyc.com.

Barclay was more than a great artist ... he was a kind, compassionate, and generous mentor.

Richard Barclay started his long career in
See full article at We Love Soaps »

When co-stars collide at Oscars: Does one win or do they split the vote? Sam Rockwell, pay attention!

When co-stars collide at Oscars: Does one win or do they split the vote? Sam Rockwell, pay attention!
It’s the dream of most actors and actresses to receive an Oscar nomination and, if they’re lucky, to win. But what happens when you’re up against a co-star from the same movie? Does one triumph or do they split the vote? Click through our photo gallery above of all the times this has happened throughout Academy Awards history.

Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson both scored Best Supporting Actor nominations for their work in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” It has been 26 years since Harvey Keitel and Ben Kingsley were both nominated for “Bugsy” (1991). Unfortunately for the duo they split their support and Jack Palance won for “City Slickers,” ironically a former victim of vote-splitting against his “Shane” co-star Brandon De Wilde (they lost to Frank Sinatra, “From Here to Eternity”).

See 2018 Oscar Best Picture predictions by experts: ‘Three Billboards’ pulls into tie with ‘The Shape of Water’ as voting ends Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars flashback: Iraq invasion in 2003 almost cancelled 75th anniversary Oscars family album reunion of 59 acting winners [Watch]

The 75th anniversary ceremony for the Academy Awards almost didn’t happen as scheduled. When America led an invasion of Iraq that weekend, broadcast network ABC pleaded with producer Gil Cates and Academy president Frank Piersen to move the event back a week. The duo claimed it would be too expensive to make the switch and that the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood would be unavailable.

On March 23, 2003, the ceremony went live on ABC as scheduled, hosted by comedian, actor, and writer Steve Martin, with the Best Picture proclaimed to be “Chicago.” However, several presenters such as Cate Blanchett, Jim Carrey, and Will Smith cancelled their appearances. That day’s events also caused several past winners to bail out on appearing in the Oscars family album slated for late in the show. Similar to a segment five years early for the 70th anniversary show (read more on the link above), the
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Furniture: Tom Sawyer's Stovepipe and Steamboat Nostalgia

"The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail. Here's Daniel Walber...

[Part One Of Our Celeste Holm Centennial Series]

On paper, 1973’s Tom Sawyer might be the oddest project of Celeste Holm’s entire career. It was her first big screen appearance in six years. She’d been splitting her time between TV and theater, making guest appearances on shows like The Fugitive and leading the national tour of Mame. And while it’s not unexpected that her return would come via an independent production, the company in question may surprise you.

Tom Sawyer was made by Reader’s Digest, during the company’s six year foray into the industry. This was their first feature, the accompanying risk of which might explain the bizarre product placement. Child star Johnny Whitaker is actually credited as appearing “through the courtesy of Elder Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of Tom Sawyer wearing apparel for boys.
See full article at FilmExperience »

March. That's a Wrap

The first quarter is done. Wheeee. We didn't escape the post-Oscar malaise that hits every year just after all that golden hoopla so we spent most of the month obsessing over Feud and Big Little Lies but hopefully we'll be roaring back to creative life in April. Here are a dozen highlights from March in case you missed any of them.

Grease 2 (1982) random thoughts on a bad movie we love

RuPaul's Drag Race goes Gaga

Three Billboards Frances McDormand slays in the trailer

The Glass Menagerie the classic reinvented, new Broadway run

Animated Tease will it be a rough year for Animated Features?

Interview: Melissa Leo on playing 'the most hated woman' 

Beauty & The Beast (1991) ranking the songs

Buffy's 20th Manuel's instagram project 

Three Fittings: The Pirate (1948) a hallucinatory musical

Interview: Celine Sciamma on her rich coming-of-age screenplays

The Furniture: The Love Witch (2016) a cohesive vision 

Barry Jenkins
See full article at FilmExperience »

My favorite best picture Oscar winner: Gentleman's Agreement

In the first of a new series, Peter Bradshaw explains why the 1947 drama about a journalist exploring antisemitism by posing as a Jew remains a sharp and high-minded watch

In 1947, the Oscar for best picture went to Gentleman’s Agreement, starring Gregory Peck as the campaigning journalist on a mission. Awards for best director also went to Elia Kazan and best supporting actress to Celeste Holm. At first glance, it looks like a rather worthy “issue movie” of the 40s, the sort of film that the Academy felt it had to honour. Yet Gentleman’s Agreement is still a riveting movie, intriguing, a little exasperating, alternately naive and very sharp, fascinating for what it puts in and leaves out.

It is about the antisemitism of prosperous postwar America and the insidious way that Jews were excluded from upscale social clubs, vacation resorts and of course jobs. There were no official bans,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Road House (1948)

The character setup in this classy noir potboiler couldn't be better, with Ida Lupino a sensation as the mountain lodge chanteuse who knows her way around men. For its first two acts the show is all but perfect. Road House Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 95 min. / Street Date September 13, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Ida Lupino, Cornel Wilde, Celeste Holm, Richard Widmark, O.Z. Whitehead, Robert Karnes, George Beranger, Ian MacDonald, Ray Teal. Cinematography Joseph Lashelle Film Editor James B. Clark Original Music Cyril J. Mokridge Written by Edward Chodorov, Margaret Gruen, Oscar Saul Produced by Edward Chodorov Directed by Jean Negulesco

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

For the first two-thirds of Jean Negulesco's Road House I thought I was seeing one of the best films noirs of the late 1940s, and even when it sagged at the end it came up with a pretty good score.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

It’s Vincent Price Week in St. Louis! Here Are His Ten Best Films

Born in St. Louis on May 27, 1911, iconic actor Vincent Price retained a special fondness for his place of origin, and that love was reciprocated with Vincentennial, a celebration of his 100th birthday in his hometown back in May of 2011 (for summary of all the Vincentennial activities go Here). One of the guests of honor at Vincentennial was Vincent Price’s daughter Victoria Price. Because of their close relationship and her access to his unpublished memoirs and letters, Victoria Price was able to provide a remarkably vivid account of her father’s public and private life in her essential book, Vincent Price, a Daughter’s Biography, originally published in 1999. .In 2011, her biography of her father was out of print. but now it’s been re-issued and Victoria will be in St. Louis this weekend (October 9th – 10th) for three special events. In addition to the biography, she will also be signing
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

More Than 'Star Wars' Actress Mom: Reynolds Shines Even in Mawkish 'Nun' Based on Tragic Real-Life (Ex-)Nun

Debbie Reynolds ca. early 1950s. Debbie Reynolds movies: Oscar nominee for 'The Unsinkable Molly Brown,' sweetness and light in phony 'The Singing Nun' Debbie Reynolds is Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” star today, Aug. 23, '15. An MGM contract player from 1950 to 1959, Reynolds' movies can be seen just about every week on TCM. The only premiere on Debbie Reynolds Day is Jerry Paris' lively marital comedy How Sweet It Is (1968), costarring James Garner. This evening, TCM is showing Divorce American Style, The Catered Affair, The Unsinkable Molly Brown, and The Singing Nun. 'Divorce American Style,' 'The Catered Affair' Directed by the recently deceased Bud Yorkin, Divorce American Style (1967) is notable for its cast – Reynolds, Dick Van Dyke, Jean Simmons, Jason Robards, Van Johnson, Lee Grant – and for the fact that it earned Norman Lear (screenplay) and Robert Kaufman (story) a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award nomination.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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