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Skidoo

Otto Preminger’s legendary disaster was also Groucho Marx’s last movie, and he’s awful in it. The director’s characteristic browbeating probably didn’t help him much. Like Roger Corman, Preminger experimented with LSD to make this movie, but a few screenings of this hopelessly clueless effort could fund another ten years of “Just Say No” propaganda. As usual for this point in Otto’s career. A great, if bizarre, cast is wasted.

The post Skidoo appeared first on Trailers From Hell.
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The Oscar that got away from Judy Garland could be won by Renee Zellweger

The Oscar that got away from Judy Garland could be won by Renee Zellweger
Perhaps Renee Zellweger will have better luck than Judy Garland did at the Academy Awards. Zellweger, who won supporting actress for 2003’s “Cold Mountain,” is the favorite to take home the Oscar next February for her haunting portrayal of the legendary star/singer in the acclaimed “Judy.”

Exactly 65 years ago, Garland was the front-runner to receive her first Academy Award for her powerhouse performance in “A Star is Born,” George Cukor‘s lavish musical version of the 1937 William Wellman classic tale of a matinee idol on the descent who marries an ingenue on the rise.

When the star-studded premiere at the Pantages Theatre aired live on TV on Sept. 29, 1954, star after star told host Jack Carson, who also appears in the film, that Garland was a shoo-in for Oscar gold. Dean Martin told the crowd Garland would probably take home every accolade and Lucille Ball echoed his sentiments.

Reviewers loved
See full article at Gold Derby »

Taika Waititi & Stephen Merchant Talk Hope, Hate and Jojo Rabbit at Fantastic Fest 2019

  • MovieWeb
Taika Waititi & Stephen Merchant Talk Hope, Hate and Jojo Rabbit at Fantastic Fest 2019
Taika Waititi has been making hilarious, well-liked movies for more than a decade. His comedic voice is incredibly distinctive, with What We Do in the Shadows perhaps being the prime example. It's the type of filmmaking that manages to round up loyal devotees.

But Hollywood became much more aware of the New Zealand-born filmmaker when Thor: Ragnarok was released and went on to become a huge hit for Marvel. So how does one follow-up such a huge blockbuster? With an unconventional World War II movie the likes of which we've never seen, Jojo Rabbit.

Much ink has been spilled over this movie, largely due to the hook, which is that Waititi is playing an imaginary version of Adolf Hitler. But the movie is much more than that. Jojo Rabbit recently screened at Fantastic Fest in Austin, Texas and Waititi, along with star Stephen Merchant made the trip to present the movie to a welcoming crowd.
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Counter Culture Icon Paul Krassner Dies at 87

Tony Sokol Jul 22, 2019

Paul Krassner got tips from Lenny Bruce, tripped with Groucho, and turned political activism into a Marx Brothers movie.

Journalist, satirist, standup comedian, and author Paul Krassner, who was one of the architects of the '60s protest movement, died Sunday at his home in Desert Hot Springs, California, according to his daughter, Holly Krassner Dawson, who confirmed the news to the Associated Press. No further details of Krassner’s death have been revealed. The founder of the Youth International Party, best known as the Yippies, had recently transitioned to hospice care after an undisclosed illness. Krassner was 87.

Krassner was born in Brooklyn on April 9, 1932. A child violin prodigy, in 1939 he became the youngest person ever to play Carnegie Hall. He was six years old.

He went on to ride the bus with Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, and became intimately acquainted with some of the
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Peter Bart: Roger Ailes Tales Taint Murdoch Legacy, But 2020 Election Might Pose Peril For Fox News’ Populist Crusades

Peter Bart: Roger Ailes Tales Taint Murdoch Legacy, But 2020 Election Might Pose Peril For Fox News’ Populist Crusades
Roger Ailes, the man who monetized vitriol while helping to elect Donald Trump, is about to become a loud presence on the screen once again, but this time he won’t be running the show. Ailes is the lead character – indeed, the heavy – in both a Showtime series that premieres next week and a star-laden new movie.

If he were alive to see these productions, Ailes surely would scream “I’m mad as hell” as loudly as Bryan Cranston’s character in Broadway’s Network. Indeed, he would have been the perfect “heavy” for that show as well.

In The Loudest Voice, which debuts June 30 on Showtime, Russell Crowe forcefully embodies the late Fox News boss who terrifies colleagues, exploits leggy blond anchors and butchers the truth in his crusade to become the Godzilla of the news business. While fostering Trump’s base, Ailes also alternately delights and infuriates his bottom-line boss,
See full article at Deadline »

Inside Neil Gaiman’s Rural Writing Retreat

  • Variety
Inside Neil Gaiman’s Rural Writing Retreat
Neil Gaiman executive produces two shows based on his books “American Gods” and “Good Omens,” so it’s only fitting that he has two office spaces. One is a “Spartan space [where] you can do nothing but write, and the only view is of trees,” he says of the eight-sided gazebo he had built out in the woods in upstate New York. “I rather grudgingly put electricity in there.” It is adorned with just a desk and two chairs so that he is forced to focus. However, he also has a slightly more traditional office where he can write “surrounded by my books and my things.”

Classic Comedy

One of the first “luxury” items Gaiman ever bought after he became a professional writer was a 14-inch statue of Groucho Marx that he saw in the Vintage Magazine Co.’s storefront in London in the late 1980s. “Up until that point everything was food,
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Doris Day, ‘Pillow Talk’ Star and Hollywood Icon, Dead at 97

Doris Day, ‘Pillow Talk’ Star and Hollywood Icon, Dead at 97
Doris Day, the actress and singer who became one of Hollywood’s biggest stars in the Fifties and Sixties, died Monday after contracting pneumonia, The Associated Press reports. She was 97.

The Doris Day Animal Foundation confirmed Day’s death, saying she died at her home in Carmel Valley, California, surrounded by close friends. “Day had been in excellent physical health for her age, until recently contracting a serious case of pneumonia, resulting in her death,” a statement from the Foundation read.

Over the course of her career, Day starred in an array of films,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ Recap: Family Ties

‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ Recap: Family Ties
A review of this week’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine, “Gintars,” coming up just as soon as I’m too sad to drink duck broth…

Jake and Amy‘s marriage has put slightly more emphasis on them as them as professional partners this season. This makes sense, and it’s been fun to see the variations in their relationship over the many episodes where they’ve shared the A-story. But that focus on the newlyweds has come at the expense of Jake’s best friend and other primary work sidekick, Charles, who
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Lost Marx Brothers Salvador Dalí Film Graphically Novelized

Tony Sokol Mar 2, 2019

Graphic novel Giraffes on Horseback Salad puts together the Salvador Dalí Marx Brothers film that was never made.

The iconic surrealist artist Salvador Dalí was obsessed with the anarchic harpist Harpo Marx and wrote a screenplay for what he hoped would become a Marx Brother movie. Or Dalí didn't hope, as he considered the screenplay art enough. The upcoming graphic novel Giraffes on Horseback Salad pieces together what some papers have called one of the greatest movies never made. Written by Josh Frank, Giraffes on Horseback Salad comes out from Quirk Publishers on March 19.

"Grab some popcorn and take a seat," reads the official book synopsis. "The curtain is about to rise on a film like no other! But first, the real-life backstory: Giraffes on Horseback Salad was a Marx Brothers film written by modern art icon Salvador Dalí, who’d befriended Harpo. Rejected by MGM, the script was thought lost forever.
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Here’s how all 4 versions of ‘A Star Is Born’ did at the Oscars (spoiler alert: not very well)

Here’s how all 4 versions of ‘A Star Is Born’ did at the Oscars (spoiler alert: not very well)
The “A Star Is Born” cinematic universe has never done that well when it comes to the Oscars, and that trend continued Sunday as Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga‘s version converted just one of its eight nominations — Best Original Song for “Shallow” — into a win. That ties the haul set by two of the previous three versions.

Here’s the Oscar history of all four “A Star Is Born” films:

1937 version: 7 nominations, 1 win, 1 honorary award

Best Picture

Best Director — William Wellman

Best Actor — Fredric March

Best Actress — Janet Gaynor

Best Original Story (win)

Best Adapted Screenplay

Best Assistant Director

Honorary Oscar to W. Howard Greene for the color photography (“A Star Is Born” was the first color film to get a Best Picture nomination)

1954 version: 6 nominations, 0 wins

Best Actor — James Mason

Best Actress — Judy Garland

Best Original Song — “The Man That Got Away”

Best Scoring of a Musical Picture

Best Art Direction,
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Rotterdam Review: ‘The Days to Come’ is an Engrossing, Energetic Elegy to Parenthood

“I lose my keys every other week. I’m a fraud of a person. Do you see me raising a kid?” When Vir finds out she’s pregnant, early into Carlos Marqués-Marcet engrossing The Days to Come (Els Dies Que Vindran), the nervous chuckles she breaks into next to her boyfriend Lluís quickly turn into tears, the couple’s dumbfounded faces belying the same question: what do we do now? It’s a story that’s been churned out countless times before: a young couple grapples with an unexpected pregnancy, ponders whether to abort or not, decides to keep the baby, and watches as a nine-month window in time shakes their relationship to the core. And yet The Days to Come still thrums with the compassion of a deeply felt memoir, an elegy for a couple fumbling into parenthood that bursts with the unbridled energy of a true, lived story.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Walking Dead Season 9 Episode 10 Review: Omega

The Walking Dead creates drama out of insecurity, and connects characters based on their shared trauma in “Omega.”

This The Walking Dead review contains spoilers.

The Walking Dead Season 9 Episode 10

Losing the Grimes family might be the best thing to happen to The Walking Dead since Frank Darabont. The Walking Dead Season 9 Episode 10 depends a great deal on two characters that wouldn't have been featured otherwise in Daryl Dixon and Henry.

Given the unique back story of those characters versus the relatively more sedate lives of Rick and Carl, what works in this week's episode featuring the two of them—and Tara for that matter—wouldn't work in the steady, sure hands of the traditional Ricktatorship.

There's an insecurity to things now. Tara doesn't know the right thing to do immediately, like Rick or Maggie would have. When faced with the choice between going after the missing Luke and Alden
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Oscars flashback 45 years to 1974: Katharine Hepburn, Liza Minnelli and the infamous streaker

Oscars flashback 45 years to 1974: Katharine Hepburn, Liza Minnelli and the infamous streaker
I was three years old in 1974. I’m giving away my age, but I love the fact that I can remember the 1970s and 1980s. The classic film stars who many young people today don’t recognize were still popping up on award and variety shows. One such very memorable occasion was the 1974 Academy Awards telecast. Granted I was too young to remember this awards show, and it would be another decade before my passion for movies took hold. However, it is one of the ceremonies that has multiple special moments that are still discussed on this anniversary 45 years later. And it took place during an era when over-the-top, cheesy broadcasts were in full bloom. This particular ceremony provided the only appearance by Katharine Hepburn at the Oscars, the youngest Oscar winner ever, an odd quartet of hosts with an opening musical by Liza Minnelli and a very shocking but amusing “visitor.
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‘A Star is Born’ at the Oscars: Can Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper overcome the curse?

‘A Star is Born’ at the Oscars: Can Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper overcome the curse?
Bradley Cooper‘s remake of “A Star is Born” underperformed at Sunday’s Golden Globes winning just one of its five races: Lady Gaga shared in the prize for Best Original Song (“Shallow”). Could these shocking losses be a sign of things to come at the Oscars? Is there a curse on this classic tale of Hollywood?

Let’s take a look back at the results of how each of the first three versions of “A Star is Born” fared at the Academy Awards. Between them, they reaped 17 nominations but won just two. The original 1937 edition claimed the screenplay award while the 1976 musical remake won Best Original Song (“Evergreen”) for its star, Barbra Streisand. She was the first female composer to win this Oscar; Lady Gaga would be the 11th.

1937 version

This was a straight drama and was a loose retelling of the 1932 flick “What Price Hollywood.” It starred two
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hollywood Flashback: James Cagney, Groucho Marx Were Among First to Join SAG in 1933

When it came to organizing film industry labor unions, The Hollywood Reporter was definitely on the side of management, which in those days was represented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

On July 12, 1933, the same day the nascent Screen Actors Guild met to choose a board of directors, THR ran a front-page story saying that the attempt to organize the film actors "has blown up" and noting that organizers had "tossed in the sponge when no interest could be generated among top-notch stars and featured players."

And there was some truth in this. The ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Pssst! Wanna win an Oscar? Change your image

Pssst! Wanna win an Oscar? Change your image
You don’t have to go the full De Niro, but an image change often leads to Oscar gold.

Known for comedy? Go dramatic. A tough guy? Go comedic. Strikingly beautiful? Glam down.

This awards season funny lady Melissa McCarthy, who earned a supporting actress Oscar nomination for the raunchy 2011 hit “Bridesmaids,” has been receiving stellar reviews for “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” as a prickly and lonely celebrity biographer. McCarthy is on the fast track for Oscar-consideration this year.

Also, a shoo-in for multiple award nomination is Lady Gaga, who traded in her meat dress and platinum blonde tresses for jeans and dark hair to play a struggling singer/songwriter in the acclaimed remake of “A Star is Born.”

Even when the Oscar was in its infancy, performers found altering an image caught the attention of the Academy voters.

DISCUSSJoin the live Oscar discussion going on right now in
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Which 9 actresses belted out big musical numbers for Oscar gold? Barbra Streisand, Emma Stone, Jennifer Hudson and more!

Which 9 actresses belted out big musical numbers for Oscar gold? Barbra Streisand, Emma Stone, Jennifer Hudson and more!
It is criminal to think that Judy Garland’s lone Best Actress Oscar nomination was for 1954’s “A Star Is Born.” She was on the comeback trail at the time, having been released from her MGM contract four years before. Her embodiment of rising star Esther Blodgett opposite James Mason, nominated as washed-up actor Norman Maine, was considered the apex of her career. When the Oscar went to Grace Kelly in the mostly now-forgotten “The Country Girl,” no less than Groucho Marx called it, “the biggest robbery since Brink’s.”

Why did Garland lose? Tom O’Neil, the Jockey-in-Chief of Gold Derby, tipped me off. She didn’t have a cathartic final song that followed her declaration to the crowd, as she mourned her husband, that she was “Mrs. Norman Maine.” In contrast, Barbra Streisand, whose 1976 version is a pale imitation, at least knew to include a final ballad — “With
See full article at Gold Derby »

Which 9 Actresses Belted Out Big Musical Numbers for Oscar Gold?

  • Gold Derby
Which 9 Actresses Belted Out Big Musical Numbers for Oscar Gold?
It is criminal to think that Judy Garland’s lone Best Actress Oscar nomination was for 1954’s “A Star Is Born.” She was on the comeback trail at the time, having been released from her MGM contract four years before. Her embodiment of rising star Esther Blodgett opposite James Mason, nominated as washed-up actor Norman Maine, was considered the apex of her career. When the Oscar went to Grace Kelly in the mostly now-forgotten “The Country Girl,” no less than Groucho Marx called it, “the biggest robbery since Brink’s.”

Why did Garland lose? Tom O’Neil, the Jockey-in-Chief of Gold Derby, tipped me off. She didn’t have a cathartic final song that followed her declaration to the crowd, as she mourned her husband, that she was “Mrs. Norman Maine.” In contrast, Barbra Streisand, whose 1976 version is a pale imitation, at least knew to include a final ballad — “With
See full article at Gold Derby »

Book-a-Day 2018 #285: High Society by Dave Sim

  • Comicmix
I don’t have an accurate record of when Dave Sim first said Cerebus would run for 300 issues. But my guess is that his plans became real during this storyline.

The first volume of Cerebus, which I covered last month , saw Sim moving rapidly from an amusing Thomas/Smith Conan parody with an oddly funny-animal main character to something more detailed and particular, and those twenty-five issues moved from standalone stories to trilogies and ongoing continuous plotlines.

No one expected Sim would then embark on a new story that would be as long as all of Cerebus to date. My guess is that not even Sim knew, when he was writing and drawing issue #26, “High Society,” that that would be the title for a much longer story. Somewhere in those first few High Society issues, though, it clicked: he wasn’t just making a somewhat longer story: his narrative would
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Today in Movie Culture: 'Captain Marvel' Trailer Redone in Lego, The Problem With Cameos and More

  • Movies.com
Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Remade Trailer of the Day: Huxley Berg Studios did their awesome thing and remade the Captain Marvel trailer in Lego:   Actor in the Spotlight: For Fandor, Jacob T. Swinney looks at the career of Oscar-winning actress and Captain Marvel star Brie Larson:   Hollywood Problem of the Day: Have the movies gone overboard with cameos lately? This video argues in the affirmative:   Movie Franchise Explanation of the Day: This video essay from Just Write shows the ultimate understanding of the meaning of The Matrix sequels:   Vintage Image of the Day: Groucho Marx, who was born on this day in 1890, enthusiastically reads his script on the set of A...
See full article at Movies.com »
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