My Favorite Mexican Directors

by chris-810-745673 | created - 02 Dec 2011 | updated - 23 Dec 2011 | Public

1. Emilio Fernández

Writer | La perla

Emilio "El Indio" Fernández Romo is the most famous person in the history of Mexican movies. For an era he symbolized Mexico due to his violent machismo, rooted in the Revolution of 1910-17, and because of his staunch commitment to Mexican cultural nationalism. Born to a Mexican (Mestizo) father ...

2. Fernando de Fuentes

Writer | Allá en el Rancho Grande

Director of two classic films of Mexican Cinema, Compadre Mendoza, El (1933) and ¡Vámonos con Pancho Villa! (1935), De Fuentes began his career as second assistant director in Santa (1931), the first "talkie" produced in Mexico. His technical abilities promoted him to direct Anónimo, El (1932). De ...

3. Luis Buñuel

Writer | Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie

The father of cinematic Surrealism and one of the most original directors in the history of the film medium, Luis Buñuel was given a strict Jesuit education (which sowed the seeds of his obsession with both religion and subversive behavior), and subsequently moved to Madrid to study at the ...

4. Julio Bracho

Director | Crepúsculo

Julio Bracho was born on July 17, 1909 in Durango, Durango, Mexico as Julio Bracho Pérez-Gavilán. He was a director and writer, known for Twilight (1945), The Absentee (1952) and Cantaclaro (1946). He was married to Rosenda Monteros and Diana Bordes. He died on April 26, 1978 in Mexico, D.F., ...

5. Guillermo del Toro

Writer | El laberinto del fauno

Guillermo del Toro was born October 9, 1964 in Guadalajara Jalisco, Mexico. Raised by his Catholic grandmother, del Toro developed an interest in filmmaking in his early teens. Later, he learned about makeup and effects from the legendary Dick Smith (The Exorcist (1973)) and worked on making his ...

6. Roberto Gavaldón

Director | El niño y la niebla

Roberto Gavaldón was born on June 7, 1909 in Jiménez, Chihuahua, Mexico as Roberto Gavaldón Leyva. He was a director and writer, known for El niño y la niebla (1953), In the Palm of Your Hand (1951) and Las tres perfectas casadas (1953). He died on September 4, 1986 in Mexico City, Mexico.

7. Arturo Ripstein

Director | Principio y fin

Arturo Ripstein began his career as assistant director (unbilled) of Luis Buñuel in Ángel exterminador, El (1962). His father, Alfredo Ripstein, Jr. produced his first film, a western written by Gabriel García Márquez titled Tiempo de morir (1965). Ripstein filmography is very praised in Mexico and...

8. Alfonso Cuarón

Writer | Gravity

Alfonso Cuarón Orozco was born on November 28th in Mexico City, Mexico. From an early age, he yearned to be either a film director or an astronaut. However, he did not want to enter the army, so he settled for directing. He didn't receive his first camera until his twelfth birthday, and then ...

9. Felipe Cazals

Director | El año de la peste

Felipe Cazals was born on July 28, 1937 in Guéthary, Pyrénées-Atlantiques, France as Felipe Cazals Siena. He is a director and writer, known for El año de la peste (1979), Las vueltas del citrillo (2005) and Canoa: A Shameful Memory (1976).

10. Carlos Enrique Taboada

Writer | Veneno para las hadas

Carlos Enrique Taboada was born on July 18, 1929 in Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico. He was a writer and director, known for Poison for the Fairies (1986), La guerra santa (1979) and La telaraña (1986). He died on April 15, 1997 in Mexico City.

11. Jaime Humberto Hermosillo

Director | La tarea

Hermosillo is one of the most successful Mexican directors of the last twenty years. Born in Aguascalientes, a small city in central Mexico, Hermosillo's films have dissected the hypocrisy of Mexican middle class and "torn the curtain" behind which many perversities are hidden. He has become an ...

12. Ismael Rodríguez

Writer | Ánimas Trujano (El hombre importante)

Ismael Rodríguez was born on October 19, 1917 in Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico as Ismael Rodríguez Ruelas. He was a writer and director, known for Ánimas Trujano (El hombre importante) (1961), Tizoc (Amor indio) (1957) and Los tres García (1947). He died on August 7, 2004 in ...

14. Alejandro Galindo

Director | Campeón sin corona

One of the most prolific and praised directors of the Golden Era of Mexican Cinema, Galindo fell in love with movies at an early age. After his family emigrated to Mexico City, young Alejandro studied to became a dentist. Eventually, he abandoned medical school and traveled to Hollywood, where he ...



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