Steptoe and Son (1962–2016)
6.0/10
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A Winter's Tale 

Harold has booked a skiing holiday to Austria and intends to go on his own - much to his father's annoyance. He has rigged up a makeshift ski slope in the back yard on which to practice but... See full summary »
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
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Harold Steptoe
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Albert Steptoe
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Storyline

Harold has booked a skiing holiday to Austria and intends to go on his own - much to his father's annoyance. He has rigged up a makeshift ski slope in the back yard on which to practice but it is less than steady and Harold comes a cropper, ending up with his leg in plaster. Of course Albert does not want the ticket to be wasted and takes the Austrian holiday himself, leaving Harold to recuperate in Stoke-on-Trent. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Comedy

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Release Date:

14 September 2016 (UK)  »

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Connections

Remake of Steptoe and Son: A Winter's Tale (1970) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Another Example of Galton and Simpson's Scriptwriting Genius
2 October 2016 | by See all my reviews

Filmed once more in front of a live audience, this remake of an episode originally broadcast in 1970 told a familiar tale of Harold (Ed Coleman) trying to escape from urban squalor in Shepherd's Bush yet being frustrated by his scheming father (Jeff Rawle).

Wisely the two actors did not attempt to recreate the vocal and gestural nuances of Corbett and Brambell, but instead provided impersonations - the kind of approach where we could laugh with them, but at the same time realizing that the modern actors were very different. On the other hand we could revel in the sheer brilliance of the Galton and Simpson script - in case we did not already know it, Harold Steptoe is another version of Hancock, the man perpetually looking for something better yet unable to find it. Both men were equipped with the ability to vocalize their frustrations in sentences that were at once funny yet exceptionally sad. Try as they might, they would never escape. Albert Steptoe, for all his tendency to act pathetic, was actually a strong and manipulative personality, keeping his unfortunate son under a tight leash and thereby restricting Harold's prospects.

Producer Owen Bell was highly successful at communicating this relationship to viewers through a camera-style based on the close-up and the two-shot. This was perhaps the biggest advantage of the studio-based sitcom - it might have been visually stereotyped, but it gave an insight into what the characters thought and felt.


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