7.3/10
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185 user 145 critic

I Origins (2014)

Trailer
2:31 | Trailer

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A molecular biologist and his laboratory partner uncover evidence that may fundamentally change society as we know it.

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Popularity
1,611 ( 100)
2 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Ian
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Dorien Makhloghi ...
7-Eleven Attendant
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Marriage Clerk (as Charles W. Gray)
John Schiumo ...
TV Anchor
Farasha Baylock ...
Posh Waitress
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Nurse
Christopher Santamaria ...
Baby Tobias
Sebastian Santamaria ...
Baby Tobias
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Dr. Simmons
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Waitress
Crystal Anne Dickinson ...
Julie Dairy
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Margaret Dairy
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Storyline

I Origins begins when graduate student, Ian Gray, is researching the evolution of human eyes with Karen and Kenny, in order to prove that eyes have evolved instead of "appeared" as creationists claim. His fascination with eyes takes him into areas that have profound personal and cultural consequences. Written by Nebzyl and Blue Coronet

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance | Sci-Fi

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some sexuality/nudity, and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

19 September 2014 (South Africa)  »

Also Known As:

O Universo no Olhar  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$27,652, 20 July 2014, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$334,658, 15 August 2014
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

2.39:1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The huge billboard for rent on the Okhla market has a 737634548 phone number on it, which adds up to 47, and 4+7, again, leads to 11. This is the billboard Ian eventually rents. See more »

Goofs

It is not correct to weight all of the Salomina's test answers equally. For example, her getting the answer for the favorite candy right should not have the same importance as her correctly recognizing her grandma's face. The test was not correctly designed. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Ian: Every living person on this planet has their own unique pair eyes. Each their own universe. My name is Doctor Ian Gray. I'm a father, and husband, and I'm a scientist. When I was a child, I realized that the camera was designed exactly like the human eye, taking in light through a lens, forming it into images. I began taking as many pictures of eyes as I possibly could. I'd like to tell you the story of the eyes that changed my world.
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Crazy Credits

After the credits, there is a scene depicting the beginning of the process of matching up famous historical figures' eyes with living people's eyes. See more »


Soundtracks

Who Are You
Written by Adrian Sherwood & Burnell Anderson
Performed by African Head Charge
Courtesy of On-U Sound Records & Music Ltd.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Beautiful actors seeking answers to profound questions
21 July 2014 | by See all my reviews

What if Shakespeare got it right when he wrote:

There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. - Hamlet (1.5.167-8), Hamlet to Horatio

Actually, we know that Shakespeare did get it right. Science adds new discoveries and corrects old theories constantly as it progresses. What's this have to do with "I, Origins"? It's one of the main themes of the movie: What if there's more to the universe than what we can perceive with our senses. Ask any real scientist and you'll find out that the concept is hardly new or controversial. We can't directly perceive radio waves or x-rays yet we make use of them every day. Nevertheless, this movie approaches the topic in a way that makes this question, perhaps, easier to approach for non-scientists.

Similarly, the movie tackles the theme of science versus religion. This theme is played up a lot in contemporary press coverage and "I, Origins" tackles this question intelligently as well. Again, ask a scientist about science and religion and you will likely find out that there isn't really a conflict between the two. Science looks into how the universe works. Religion is concerned with why? "How" and "why" are two sides of the same coin.

The movie also explores the long-existing notion that we are in some way tied to certain individuals for all time. Soul mates, if you will. Don't ask a scientist about that one.

The main actors in "I, Origins" are young and beautiful. Even the lab rat, played by Brit Marling, who starred in director Mike Cahill's prior and debut film "Another Earth," cannot hide her exceptional beauty behind glasses and sweats or a pregnancy suit. So if you enjoy seeing beautiful people asking seemingly profound questions in interesting settings, this is your movie.

Like Cahill's "Another Earth," this movie probes profound questions about the human existence. It's beautifully shot (though I think it needs some more editing), well acted by attractive people, and in the end will probably get you thinking. If that sounds like a mystical experience and a good investment of two hours of your time, then this film's something you should see.

We saw this film as part of the Camera Cinema Club series in San Jose.


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