6.9/10
36,336
140 user 289 critic

Anonymous (2011)

PG-13 | | Drama, Thriller | 28 October 2011 (UK)
Trailer
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The theory that it was in fact Edward De Vere, Earl of Oxford, who penned Shakespeare's plays. Set against the backdrop of the succession of Queen Elizabeth I and the Essex rebellion against her.

Director:

Writer:

Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 7 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Earl of Essex (as Sebastian Reid)
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Paolo De Vita ...
Francesco
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Christopher Marlowe
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Thomas Dekker
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Thomas Nashe
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Captain Richard Pole
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Storyline

Edward De Vere, Earl of Oxford, is presented as the real author of Shakespeare's works. Edward's life is followed through flashbacks from a young child, through to the end of his life. He is portrayed as a child prodigy who writes and performs A Midsummer Night's Dream for a young Elizabeth I. A series of events sees his plays being performed by a frontman, Shakespeare. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Was Shakespeare a Fraud?

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violence and sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Release Date:

28 October 2011 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Anónimo  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,012,768, 30 October 2011, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$4,463,292

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$15,395,087
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vanessa Redgrave and Joely Richardson play the older and younger versions of Queen Elizabeth respectively. In real-life they are mother and daughter. See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h 50 mins) When Jonson is thrown out of The Globe, the Earl of Oxford's man's image is printed backward with the Earl's Crest reversed and on the right breast rather than the left breast and the buttons on the suit backward, because the image was flopped in editing. See more »

Quotes

Young Earl of Oxford: [after sword gets knocked into young Robert Cecil's chess game] You were losing anyway.
Boy Robert Cecil: [had been playing alone] I was also winning!
Young Earl of Oxford: [tosses a piece back at Robert, who misses it] Really?
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Crazy Credits

Apart from the production companies, the only opening credit is the movie's title, displayed on the marquee of the prologue's theater. See more »

Connections

Featured in Great Movie Mistakes IV (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Night of the Long Knives
Written by Byrd & David Hirschfelder (as Hirschfelder)
Performed by David Hirschfelder
Courtesy of The Decca Music Group
Under licence from Universal Music Operations Ltd.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Another Pseudo-Historical Mishmash
23 July 2016 | by See all my reviews

I'll admit that a major pet-peeve is any movie being blatantly inaccurate when accuracy is readily available with a little decent research. Anonymous is so false in so many ways it would waste too much time to name them all. Sure, you can take certain liberties for the sake of a story arc, but the script is so over-the-top wrong it drives right into a ditch. And what's especially worrisome is that unsuspecting viewers might buy all this malarkey as truth. Shakespeare as illiterate? Are you kidding me? Queen Elizabeth, a long reigning and strong monarch, as a dupe to slimy obsequious advisers whose motives are totally obvious? Ridiculous. Well-known historic and literary figures like Jonson, Marlowe, and Shakespeare himself, played as petty sniveling punks? Really? Other historic figures distorted completely out of their true contexts? This movie bombed for good reasons.


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