6.9/10
36,469
140 user 289 critic

Anonymous (2011)

PG-13 | | Drama, Thriller | 28 October 2011 (UK)
Trailer
7:58 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
The theory that it was in fact Edward De Vere, Earl of Oxford, who penned Shakespeare's plays. Set against the backdrop of the succession of Queen Elizabeth I and the Essex rebellion against her.

Director:

Writer:

Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 7 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Earl of Essex (as Sebastian Reid)
...
...
Paolo De Vita ...
Francesco
...
Christopher Marlowe
...
Thomas Dekker
...
Thomas Nashe
...
Captain Richard Pole
Edit

Storyline

Edward De Vere, Earl of Oxford, is presented as the real author of Shakespeare's works. Edward's life is followed through flashbacks from a young child, through to the end of his life. He is portrayed as a child prodigy who writes and performs A Midsummer Night's Dream for a young Elizabeth I. A series of events sees his plays being performed by a frontman, Shakespeare. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Was Shakespeare a Fraud?

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violence and sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Release Date:

28 October 2011 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Anónimo  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,012,768, 30 October 2011, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$4,463,292

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$15,395,087
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

John Orloff wrote the script back in 1998, but the project never took off at that time because of the release of the other Shakespeare-related film, Shakespeare in Love (1998). The project was then restarted back in 2005, when Roland Emmerich saw the script, but it only got the go ahead in early 2010 after additional research and revision. See more »

Goofs

When Ben Jonson first arrives at the home of the Earl of Oxford after being released from prison the Earl is shown cutting, holding, smelling, and then referring to a white and red rose as "The Tudor Rose". "The Tudor Rose" is actually a heraldic emblem of England that is a combination of the white rose and the red rose of the House of York and the House of Lancaster, respectively. It is not, nor has it ever actually been, the actual bloom of a rose bush. See more »

Quotes

Young Earl of Oxford: [after sword gets knocked into young Robert Cecil's chess game] You were losing anyway.
Boy Robert Cecil: [had been playing alone] I was also winning!
Young Earl of Oxford: [tosses a piece back at Robert, who misses it] Really?
See more »

Crazy Credits

Apart from the production companies, the only opening credit is the movie's title, displayed on the marquee of the prologue's theater. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Brows Held High: The Devils (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Night of the Long Knives
Written by Byrd & David Hirschfelder (as Hirschfelder)
Performed by David Hirschfelder
Courtesy of The Decca Music Group
Under licence from Universal Music Operations Ltd.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Wow! You've got to see this. Whether true or not, it's a fascinating film.
19 November 2011 | by See all my reviews

Everyone in our theater was so mesmerized by this many-layered plot that no one even got up to go the bathroom. My head was spinning a bit, trying to keep up with who was related to whom, but I loved every minute of it.

And I know the cast is highly pedigreed because I recognized some of the actors in the plays from a live performance of Shakespeare the Old Globe Theater troupe gave at UCLA a few years ago while the Old Globe was being renovated. Annette Bening was in the audience that night, so it was a pretty cool evening all around.

After the movie I was at a restaurant next to the theater and I heard a woman say, "I just saw that Shakespeare movie and I'm in a daze."

Go see it and you will be, too. I think I need to see it a few more times to pick up all the fascinating details.


70 of 105 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 140 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page