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In Paris in 1931, an orphan named Hugo Cabret who lives in the walls of a train station is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (book)
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1,341 ( 215)
Won 5 Oscars. Another 57 wins & 185 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Monsieur Labisse
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Policeman
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Young Tabard
Shaun Aylward ...
Street Kid
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Storyline

Hugo is an orphan boy living in the walls of a train station in 1930s Paris. He learned to fix clocks and other gadgets from his father and uncle which he puts to use keeping the train station clocks running. The only thing that he has left that connects him to his dead father is an automaton (mechanical man) that doesn't work without a special key. Hugo needs to find the key to unlock the secret he believes it contains. On his adventures, he meets George Melies, a shopkeeper, who works in the train station, and his adventure-seeking god-daughter. Hugo finds that they have a surprising connection to his father and the automaton, and he discovers it unlocks some memories the old man has buried inside regarding his past. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

One of the most legendary directors of our time takes you on an extraordinary adventure. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for mild thematic material, some action/peril and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

23 November 2011 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Invention of Hugo Cabret  »

Box Office

Budget:

$150,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$11,364,505 (USA) (18 November 2011)

Gross:

$73,820,094 (USA) (6 April 2012)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film was one of a number of movies that were in competition at the 2012 Academy Awards that were related to France and French culture in some way. The films included The Artist (2011), Hugo (2011), War Horse (2011), Midnight in Paris (2011), The Adventures of Tintin (2011), Puss in Boots (2011) from the French fairy-tale by Charles Perrault, Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) based on the novel by Pierre Boulle and Une vie de chat (2010). Interestingly though, there was no French film nominated for the Best Foreign Film Academy Award (Oscar) in 2012. See more »

Goofs

The concealed compartment in the armoire catches Hugo's eye because the right hand side of the bottom of the board covering it projects out rather than being flush with the rest of the front (0:59:19 to 0:59:20). In a close-up while Isabelle investigates it (0:59:51 to 0:59:52), it is the left hand side of the bottom of the board projecting out. She presses on it (0:59:53) and it slides into a flush fit, but, after a brief cut to Hugo, the left side is shown projecting out again. See more »

Quotes

Isabelle: We could get into trouble.
Hugo Cabret: That's how you know it's an adventure.
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Crazy Credits

There is only one opening credit, the film's title, which does not appear until nearly 15 minutes into the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Art Mystery (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Ça Gaze
Composed by V. Marceau
Produced by Jean-Michel Bernard
Performed by Les Primitifs du Futur: Dominique Cravic, Hervé Legeay, Romane, Jean-Philippe Viret, Mathilde Febrer and Daniel Colin
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Scorsese's first movie for kids is a Masterpiece
9 November 2011 | by (Hollywood) – See all my reviews

I attended the DGA screening over the weekend, followed by a Q&A moderated by James Cameron. Cameron's first words (after correctly referring to Scorsese as "maestro"), were "I thought we'd just geek out over 3D for a half hour, but having seen the movie... it's a masterpiece." I brought my ten year old daughter, who sat -- if anything -- even more transfixed than I did. Every single image is arresting, the use of 3D is perfection itself, the story is engaging and thrilling and heartbreaking and uplifting and I never wanted it to end. If only it'd be three hours! All the performances are excellent, including the kids. Great British actors appear in roles with only a line or two, but it helps lift the movie into the realm of Instant Classic, and Sacha Baron Cohen brings nuance and heart to his humorous role as the Station Inspector. On the way to the car my daughter asked if we could get the blu-ray when it's available, and I had the same feeling as well.


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