On his sprawling country estate, an aging writer matches wits with the struggling actor who has stolen his wife's heart.

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(adapted from the play by), (screenplay)

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Storyline

Two extremely clever British men are in a game of trickery and deceit. Andrew Wyke, an aging famous author who lives alone in a high-tech mansion, after his wife Maggie has left him for a younger man; and Milo Tindle, an aspiring actor, equipped with charm and wit, who demonstrates both qualities once again. When Wyke invites Tindle to his mansion, Tindle seeks to convince the former into letting his wife go by signing the divorce paper. However, Wyke seems far more interested in playing mind games with his wife's new lover, and lures him into a series of actions he thoroughly planned in seeking revenge on his unfaithful spouse. Written by Postalj (Taken from Sa'ar Vardi's post)

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Obey the rules.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

23 November 2007 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

1 Mord für 2  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$46,265 (USA) (14 October 2007)

Gross:

$342,835 (USA) (20 January 2008)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sir Michael Caine (Andrew Wyke) played the role of Milo Tindle in the original version: Sleuth (1972). See more »

Goofs

(at around 9 mins) When Andrew and Milo are sitting at either end of the long table enjoying a drink, the position of the bottle changes. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Andrew Wyke: Yes?
Milo Tindle: Andrew Wyke?
Andrew Wyke: That's right.
Milo Tindle: I'm Milo Tindle.
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Connections

Remake of Sleuth (1972) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A remake that adds, not subtracts, from the remarkable experience of the original drama or first motion picture production.
13 October 2007 | by (Los Angeles) – See all my reviews

Luckily for me, I saw the original 1972 version of Sleuth. That production has remained among my all-time favorite pictures, and when I am called upon to list my personal top-ten, Sleuth 1972 is on it.

Branaugh's new take on this exciting, captivating story is a thrilling, intellectually engaging motion picture. Michael Caine's return to the project in the role of his 1972 opposite gives the picture a haunting quality that I found mesmerizing. I couldn't take my eyes and ears away from the screen, because I didn't want to miss a frame or a sound. I was delighted at seeing a remake (as a film historian, archivist, and movie fanatic, I HATE remakes!) that was just as glorious for me as the original.

I now consider the 1972 version and this re-interpretation to work together as a single remarkable cinematic experience. I was fascinated by the different designs, time-periods, and techniques juxtaposed by the two films working side-by-side. If you appreciate great cinema, and have a hunger to devour only he best movies, I recommend that you see this picture, and run right out to the video store to get the earlier version, too. Don't compare and contrast the two movies, Just sit back, surrender, and be carried away by great dialog, images, sounds, and all of the other things about movies that both of these pictures present and that makes you love them.


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