Twin Peaks (1990–1991)
9.3/10
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13 user 11 critic

Episode #2.22 

Cooper must overcome his deepest fears as he enters the Black Lodge to save Annie from Windom Earle.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Shelly Johnson (as Madchen Amick)
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James Hurley (credit only)
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Jocelyn Packard (credit only)
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Storyline

In the cliff-hanging series finale, Cooper must face his innermost fears as he tracks down Windom Earle, who has abducted Annie and taken her into the hellish realm of the Black Lodge. Meanwhile, Nadine, wounded by a hit on the head during the beauty pageant, wakes up now back to her old self, and becomes very upset when she sees Big Ed with Norma. Donna struggles to control herself from Ben Horne's news, which leads to a fistfight between him and Dr. Hayward who angrily knocks Ben into a fireplace mantle for interfering with his family, and apparently killing him. While Truman and Andy wait and wait for Cooper to return from the Black Lodge, Andrew and Pete steal the safety deposit box key and go to the Twin Peaks Savings and Loan where Audrey is staging a feeble act of civil disobedience. But when Andrew and Pete open Thomas Eckhardt's final box, they instead find a bomb - which explodes. Major Briggs receives a cryptic message from Windom Earle in the Black Lodge through the ... Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

10 June 1991 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Had BBC2 not put the show on a 3 week break for World Snooker coverage after Episode #2.15, this episode would have aired in the UK BEFORE the US due to their hiatus of the show allowing the UK to catch up. It ultimately went out one week later than the US on June 18th 1991. See more »

Goofs

In the bank scene, when the teller is bringing Audrey a glass of water, a boom mic is clearly visible at the top of the screen for several seconds. See more »

Quotes

[last line of the series]
Dale Cooper: How's Annie? How's Annie?
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Connections

Referenced in Stranger Things: Chapter Eight: The Upside Down (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Sycamore Trees
Lyric by David Lynch
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
Performed by Jimmy Scott (as The Legendary Jimmy Scott)
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User Reviews

 
Let's Down The Entire Series
28 July 2011 | by (utah) – See all my reviews

The bittersweet climatic, series finale is a let down of all the episodes that proceeded it. It is almost as if the anger and resentment of the creator of the series scrambling to toss together elements in a attempt to tie up lose ends allowed his own feelings to seep into the finale. Instead of a two-part finale, the one hour final episode seemed disjointed, a buckshot of happy and sad dispositions of the main characters that had no connection to any theme or premise. The primary difficulty is that the tone of the finale didn't seem to be consistent with the rest of the series... True to life, it didn't matter if one was smart or dumb, good looking or no ugly, a "good" or "bad" person, what ultimately occurred was based on luck, fate what have you and all the effort one put into life all came down to "whatever." To its credit, the finale represented real life to a point. Not everybody gets their due, not everybody wins in the end. Yet, without "Criminal Minds" series concluding words of wisdom at the end of each of its episodes, "Twin Peaks" finale leaves the audience with a bitter taste in one's mouth, a director who didn't have sufficient time to really flesh our nor think through the severely time-limited script. At least "Defying Gravity" was given a decent burial in its story arc. As for "Twin Peaks" the jarring nature of the true David Lynch's propensity for the bizarre came full blast at the end as if such craziness would make up for the rushed job of having to conclude the series in such an untimely fashion.


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