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The Host (2006)

Gwoemul (original title)
A monster emerges from Seoul's Han River and focuses its attention on attacking people. One victim's loving family does what it can to rescue her from its clutches.

Director:

(as Joon Ho Bong)

Writers:

(screenplay) (as Joon Ho Bong), (screenplay) (as Jun-won Ha) | 1 more credit »
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2,265 ( 147)

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25 wins & 25 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Hee-Bong Byun ...
Park Hie-bong (as Byun Hee-bong)
...
Park Nam-il
...
Park Nam-Joo (as Bae Doo-na)
...
Park Hyun-seo (as Ko A-sung)
...
The Monster (voice)
Jae-eung Lee ...
Se-jin
Dong-ho Lee ...
Se-joo
Je-mun Yun ...
Homeless Man
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Donald (as David Joseph Anselmo)
Martin Lord Cayce ...
U.S. Senator
Cristen Cho
...
Additional Voices (voice)
Paul Lazar ...
US Doctor trying to operate Gang-Du
Brian Lee
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Storyline

The film revolves around Park Hee-bong, a man in his late 60s. He runs a small snack bar on the banks of the Han River and lives with his two sons, one daughter, and one granddaughter. The Parks seem to lead a quite ordinary and peaceful life, but maybe they are a bit poorer than the average Seoulite. Hee-bong's elder son Gang-du is an immature and incompetent man in his 40s, whose wife left home long ago. Nam-il is the youngest son, an unemployed grumbler, and daughter Nam-joo is an archery medalist and member of the national team. One day, an unidentified monster suddenly appears from the depths of the Han River and spreads panic and death, and Gang-du's daughter Hyun-seo is carried off by the monster and disappears. All of the family members are in a great agony because they lost someone very dear to them. But when they find out she is still alive, they resolve to save her. Written by Plot Summary

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Man has made his newest predator See more »

Genres:

Action | Horror | Sci-Fi

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for creature violence and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

30 March 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Host  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

KRW 12,215,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

KRW 10,002,411,650 (South Korea) (30 July 2006)

Gross:

$2,201,923 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Joon-ho Bong and the designer of the creature nicknamed it Steve Buscemi, based on the actor's screen persona and the way he acted in the movie Fargo (1996). See more »

Goofs

The sewerage they are searching the monster in, is dry and clean. See more »

Quotes

Park Hie-bong: I received a complaint from Mat Number 4. Their squid had only nine legs. Did you eat one?
Park Gang-Du: No.
Park Hie-bong: Don't deny it. Why touch other people's things? Think of it from the customer's perspective. A squid. The torso tastes delicious, but the legs, especially the longest one, has something special, right?
[He pulls a half eaten squid leg out of the pocket of Gang-du's hoodie]
Park Hie-bong: [Thrusting a tray into his son's arms] Take this to Mat Number 4. Tell them it's on the house.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Just before the credits ends, you can hear a loud roar of the monster. See more »

Connections

Spoofed in The Monster Thing (2012) See more »

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User Reviews

 
One crazy horror comedy drama socio-political allegory
26 November 2012 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

"The Host" is as deceptive and intriguing as its title (there's currently a 6-page thread in the discussion board and we still haven't figured it out). The movie can be taken as a straightforward monster flick, a dark comedy, a sentimental drama, or a rich socio-political allegory.

For the sake of this review, let's approach it as more than an action/comedy/horror flick, and let's assume it's a deeper allegory. There's definitely a lot of symbolism, lots of cultural references and outright satire for you to munch on. I think that's what makes this seemingly-ordinary monster flick into a powerful film.

Right in the first scene, the director sets the tone with a caricature of Western (U.S.) muddling. Like the excellent Korean film "Welcome to Dongmakgol" released a year earlier, this film is not exactly complimentary toward America, so if that irritates you, you might want to skip this. But when you consider all the 80s Hollywood flicks that painted Russia as a villain, I guess it's fair enough that the USA should take its lumps.

(I did want to add that the director takes a diplomatic approach, mocking the American "establishment" while indirectly praising the American individual. He does this by including an American tourist who's really cool. So in other words, his criticisms are not one-sided.)

The plot is two-dimensional but the symbolic implications are profound. The story is about a monster that terrorizes the banks of the Han River and grabs a young girl, prompting her bumbling family to lead a rescue effort, with no help from the Korean authorities. Some say that the monster represents Western imperialism. It could represent a figurative "attack" on Korean culture, autonomy and sovereignty. Or it could even be taken literally to represent environmental terrors caused by American apathy.

Don't worry, the USA isn't the only target here. There are some pretty good jabs at the Korean authorities too, insinuating (in a way that's both entertaining and irritating) that the Korean government is apathetic & hopeless. "So much for Korea's new democracy," says one character at one point in the film. Some critics point out interesting parallels & allusions to the 1980 Gwangju Uprising (where the Korean Government botched the whole situation, killing & wounding hundreds at a student protest). Everyone is fair game in a dark satire like this. In that respect it reminded me of the excellent Veerhoven scifi satires "Starship Troopers" and "Robocop".

Like all good satires, there's a nice amount of comedy to remind us not to take everything at face value. The bumbling family provides some great laughs in the first half, and certain scenes in the hospital are reminiscent of the sarcastic masterpiece "Brazil" with its merciless mockery of all institutional powers. The scene where they're looking for a virus in a guy's head is both riotously hilarious and profoundly disturbing.

I did want to mention one thing in case you're wondering. No, the audience isn't supposed to feel sympathy for the monster, not like in "King Kong". I was actually surprised at that (in a good way), because the director didn't stray from his message with any gratuitous sentimentality. Normally I'm not a fan of killer animal flicks (Jaws, etc) because I usually find myself siding with the animals more readily than the humans. But this film managed to avoid all sympathies, since the monster itself is a product of human idiocy (which is explained in the first scene).

Well I've just thrown a bunch of ideas at you, and I don't claim any of them to be absolute. But the point is that this seemingly-ordinary horror flick is so much more. It's entirely up to you how you want to see it. Like I said up front, you can just see it as a straightforward monster flick, but I think if you read deeper into the parallels with current Korean society, you'll get a whole lot more out of this.


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