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Doc Corner: David Lynch and the Allure of 'Blue Velvet Revisited'

By Glenn Dunks

The massive Doc NYC festival continues this week in New York City until the 16th, showcasing over 250 films and events. We have one more capsule collection to go up the coming days to close out the festival, but today we're entering the wonderful and strange world of David Lynch in Blue Velvet Revisited, which screens tonight at Cinepolis Chelsea at 9.30pm.

I don’t know about you, but 2017 hasn’t been the strongest year for movies in my eyes. Part of that may have to do directly with the product itself. But a more significant part is that quite literally no movie I have seen this year has had quite the gravitational pull of Twin Peaks. The return of David Lynch and Mark Frost’s classic 1990s television series was maligned by many, but found a dedicated collection of fans for whom it was 18-hours of pure Lynchian madness,
See full article at FilmExperience »

David Lynch as Actor: How His Onscreen Persona Has Evolved From ‘The Cleveland Show’ to ‘Lucky’

  • Indiewire
David Lynch as Actor: How His Onscreen Persona Has Evolved From ‘The Cleveland Show’ to ‘Lucky’
Here’s a strange thought: David Lynch has been in front of the camera more often in the last 10 years than he’s been behind it. Though rarely thought of as an actor in the same manner as other on-camera directors, Lynch has appeared not only in several of his own projects — most recently the “Twin Peaks” revival, in which his Gordon Cole became one of the main characters — but an expectedly far-flung range of others as well. Though he only lends his voice to some of them, he imbues each role with his nonpareil essence.

Read More:Why ‘Lucky’ Should Earn the Late Harry Dean Stanton His First Oscar

Lynch made no feature-length films or TV series in the 11 long years between the release of “Inland Empire” and this new “Twin Peaks,” but he did grace us with his presence onscreen several times. Most prominently — and weirdly, and hilariously — that
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks: The Return’: Even David Lynch’s Cinematographer Can’t Explain What It All Means

  • Indiewire
‘Twin Peaks: The Return’: Even David Lynch’s Cinematographer Can’t Explain What It All Means
Peter Deming is at a slight disadvantage when talking about “Twin Peaks: The Return” compared to most other cinematographers discussing their latest work. He’s only familiar with the project as one long feature film, having gone into production with a 500-plus page script that didn’t have episode breaks, rather than the 18 episodes that Showtime aired this year.

“We also shot it like a feature film,” said Deming in an interview with IndieWire. “When you went to a location, you shot all the action that took place at that location. It’s different than TV – there’s no episode scripts, there’s one director, there’s one crew. So we broke it down and scheduled it like a feature film.”

This “block shooting” approach is impossible for most television shows, which are still being written when production begins on the first episode of the season. It’s a far more efficient approach,
See full article at Indiewire »

Blu-ray Review: David Lynch: The Art Life Lives Well via Criterion

To quote a certain giant, it's happening... again. It's happening... again. To quote the giant who created the giant, you drink coffee, you smoke cigarettes, you paint, and that's it. That quote, from filmmaker David Lynch, has been widely used in promotion for this documentary which is all about him and his processes in creating art. But what isn't necessary being flagged up is the fact that for Lynch, this is an ideal, not the reality. With the recent cult popularity of Showtime's admired and debated Twin Peaks: The Return, David Lynch has re-entered the cinema zeitgeist. It's been far too long since 2006's Inland Empire, his previous widely released filmmaking effort. What was he doing in the interim? Unsurprisingly true to established form, he'd...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Is ‘Mulholland Drive’ Really the Greatest Film of the 21st Century? (Or How I Learned to Love David Lynch)

  • Slash Film
Is ‘Mulholland Drive’ Really the Greatest Film of the 21st Century? (Or How I Learned to Love David Lynch)
Until a few months ago, if the name David Lynch came up in film discussion, I would have inwardly shrugged. It had been years since I watched one of Lynch’s films. It had also been years since Lynch had even made a new feature (the last one being Inland Empire in 2006). But after screening […]

The post Is ‘Mulholland Drive’ Really the Greatest Film of the 21st Century? (Or How I Learned to Love David Lynch) appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Harry Dean Stanton Remembered as Hollywood Mourns Cult Favorite

  • MovieWeb
Harry Dean Stanton Remembered as Hollywood Mourns Cult Favorite
Harry Dean Stanton passed away yesterday at the age of 91 and Hollywood has taken to social media to pay tribute to the screen legend who starred in Alien, Twin Peaks and everything in between. According to TMZ, the actor passed away peacefully at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. Stanton's career spanned more than 6 decades in numerous television and movie projects and he was also a Navy veteran of World War II.

Harry Dean Stanton was born in Irvine, Kentucky and raised with a musical background while attending Lafayette High School and the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Stanton sings, plays guitar, and plays the harmonica. After performing theater in college, Stanton said that he had to choose between being an actor and a musician while also mentioning that he could have been a writer as well after studying journalism. He was convinced to get into acting and the rest is history.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Six Harry Dean Stanton films you can't afford to miss by Jennie Kermode

Harry Dean Stanton as Carl Rodd in Twin Peaks

He was the son of a cook and a tobacco farmer, a Kentucky boy who took a big risk by dropping out of university to pursue an acting career, but by the time he died on Friday at the age of 91, Harry Dean Stanton had appeared in more than 100 films. They include a host of hits: The Last Temptation Of Christ, Cool Hand Luke, Pretty In Pink, The Green Mile, Inland Empire and more. He had bit parts in the likes of The Godfather 2, In The Heat Of The Night and How The West Was Won, though sadly his scenes in Cheech and Chong's stoner classic Up In Smoke went up in smoke themselves. But some of his work was truly unforgettable. If you see nothing else, you have to check out these.

Repo Man

Repo Man

"The life of
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Harry Dean Stanton dies at 91 by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-09-16 01:06:05

Harry Dean Stanton - an American original

American Twin Peaks and Paris, Texas star Harry Dean Stanton has died at the age of 91. The character actor, who racked up roles in scores of films across more than six decades, died of natural causes.

Kentucky-born Stanton appeared in a slew hit films including, Cool Hand Luke, Alien, Escape From New York and Repo Man.

One of his most frequent collaborators was director David Lynch, who worked with him on Wild At Heart , Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Men and Inland Empire. He also worked with him on the most recent series of Twin Peaks.

A statement from @DAVID_LYNCH on the passing of the great Harry Dean Stanton. #RIPHarryDeanStanton #TwinPeaks #Showtime pic.twitter.com/EmsO1zotsk

Twin Peaks (@SHO_TwinPeaks) September 15, 2017 Lynch last night paid tribute to his friend. He wrote: “The great Harry Dean Stanton has...
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

R.I.P. Harry Dean Stanton (1926 – 2017)

Prolific character actor Harry Dean Stanton has passed away of natural causes aged 91, it has been announced today.

Born in 1926, Stanton enjoyed a career than spanned over 60 years, appearing in a host of films including Cool Hand Luke, Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid, Kelly’s Heroes, The Godfather Part II, Alien, Escape from New York and Repo Man before securing his first ever lead role in 1984’s Palme d’Or winner Paris, Texas.

Later credits included Pretty in Pink, The Last Temptation of Christ, Wild at Heart, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, The Green Mile, The Pledge, Inland Empire, Rango, The Avengers, and the HBO series Big Love. He recently appeared in David Lynch’s Twin Peaks revival, and his final film Lucky is set for release in the States later this month.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

David Lynch on Harry Dean Stanton: ‘He Was a Great Actor and a Great Human Being’

David Lynch on Harry Dean Stanton: ‘He Was a Great Actor and a Great Human Being’
Filmmaker David Lynch has paid tribute to his friend and frequent cast member Harry Dean Stanton, who died Friday at age 91.

“The great Harry Dean Stanton has left us,” Lynch wrote. “There went a great one. There’s nobody like Harry Dean. Everyone loved him. And with good reason. He was a great actor (actually beyond great) – and a great human being – so great to be around him!!! You are really going to be missed Harry Dean!!! Loads of love to you wherever you are now!!!”

Stanton was most recently on screen this summer in Lynch’s “Twin Peaks: The Return.”

Stanton appeared in Lynch’s 1990 film “Wild at Heart” and in 1992’s “Twin Peaks: A Fire Walk With Me,” although he was not in the original “Twin Peaks” series that aired from 1990-91 on ABC. Stanton also had role in Lynch’s 1999’s “The Straight Story” and 2006’s “Inland Empire.”

In
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

  • Indiewire
Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91
Harry Dean Stanton has died at 91, reports TMZ. The actor, a screen legend who endeared himself to moviegoers for his performances in everything from “Pretty in Pink” and “The Godfather Part II” to “Alien” and “Repo Man,” passed away peacefully at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles.

Read More:‘Lucky’ Review: 90-Year-Old Harry Dean Stanton Gives a Performance for the Ages in Wry Comedy Co-Starring David Lynch — SXSW 2017

Best known as a character actor, Stanton had his share of leading roles as well. None was more moving than Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” in which he plays a grief-stricken drifter who attempts to reconnect with his former life. Stanton frequently collaborated with David Lynch, appearing in “Wild at Heart,” “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me,” “The Straight Story,” “Inland Empire,” and the just-concluded “Twin Peaks” revival.

Read More:‘Lucky’ Trailer: Harry Dean Stanton and David Lynch Reunite For This Wise Meditation on
See full article at Indiewire »

Harry Dean Stanton, ‘Big Love,’ ‘Twin Peaks’ Star, Dies at 91

Harry Dean Stanton, ‘Big Love,’ ‘Twin Peaks’ Star, Dies at 91
Harry Dean Stanton, the actor with a gaunt, bedraggled look who labored in virtual obscurity for decades until a series of roles increased his visibility, including his breakthrough in Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” died of natural causes Friday in Los Angeles. He was 91.

The actor was also known for his roles in “Twin Peaks,” “Big Love,” “Pretty in Pink,” and “Repo Man.”

He had a high-profile role as manipulative cult leader Roman Grant on HBO polygamy drama “Big Love,” which ran from 2006-11, and recently appeared as Carl Rodd in the “Twin Peaks” revival on Showtime.

His most recent film, “Lucky,” about an atheist who comes to terms with his own mortality, is set to be released by Magnolia on Sept. 29.

In 1984, when he turned 58, he not only starred in the Wenders’ “Paris, Texas” — his first role ever as leading man — but in Alex Cox’s popular cult film “Repo Man.” (That
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Harry Dean Stanton, ‘Big Love,’ ‘Twin Peaks’ Star, Dies at 91

Harry Dean Stanton, ‘Big Love,’ ‘Twin Peaks’ Star, Dies at 91
Harry Dean Stanton, the actor with a gaunt, bedraggled look who labored in virtual obscurity for decades until a series of roles increased his visibility, including his breakthrough in Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” died of natural causes Friday in Los Angeles. He was 91.

The actor was also known for his roles in “Twin Peaks,” “Big Love,” “Pretty in Pink” and “Repo Man.”

He had a high-profile role as manipulative cult leader Roman Grant on HBO polygamy drama “Big Love,” which ran from 2006-11, and recently appeared as Carl Rodd in the “Twin Peaks” revival on Showtime.

His most recent film, “Lucky,” about an atheist who comes to terms with his own mortality, is set to be released by Magnolia on Sept. 29.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Twin Peaks: was this the long, perfect goodbye from David Lynch?

Twin Peaks: the Return was the culmination of Lynch’s life’s work. But its last, weary moments were surely proof that he’s bowing out on us

David Lynch’s debut Eraserhead was the greatest home movie ever made. Shot over five years in a disused stable block behind the American Film Institute where the director was living at the time, it was painstakingly constructed frame by frame by a group of committed friends – the very definition of a labour of love. Exactly 40 years later, Lynch has just completed his most personal project since. Twin Peaks: the Return may have had a starry cast, cutting-edge digital effects and an 18-hour run time. But at heart, it was just another home movie: the work of an artist coming full circle, incorporating everything he’s learned in four decades as a filmmaker back into the hands-on, Diy template he established with his first film.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Why 'Twin Peaks: The Return' Was the Most Groundbreaking TV Series Ever

Why 'Twin Peaks: The Return' Was the Most Groundbreaking TV Series Ever
When some phrases pass through the prism of Twin Peaks, you can never hear them the same way again. "Damn good coffee" is one; "Gotta light?" is another. We'll submit a third candidate, one that the just-concluded third season of David Lynch and Mark Frost's supernatural murder-mystery masterpiece has marked for permanent retirement from the critical vocabulary: "Like nothing else on television." The TV landscape remains full of singular, spectacular shows, Peak TV fatigue be damned. But just as the original Twin Peaks inspired visionary showrunners from David Chase
See full article at Rolling Stone »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 16 Recap: You've Made My Heart So Full

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series."Finally," says the One-Armed Man a.k.a. Phillip Gerard (Al Strobel) about midway through Part 16 of Mark Frost and David Lynch's Twin Peaks revival, right after a certain FBI Special Agent returns to the world of the living. It's been 13 episodes since we've seen full trace of Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan), though even then he wasn't entirely himself. (Being trapped for 25 years in the otherworldly Black Lodge has a way of tempering certain personality traits.) Now, however, he's "one hundred percent" (in his estimation, anyway), and there's certainly plenty of giddy pleasure to be had watching the energetic, Boy Scout-like Cooper of old take charge. But that presumes that this is the Dale Cooper of old, and it quickly becomes apparent that that's not the case.
See full article at MUBI »

The ‘Inside’ Remake Gets European Release

The ‘Inside’ Remake Gets European Release
With screenplay by Jaume Balagueró ([Rec]) and director Miguel Ángel Vivas’ usual collaborator Manu Díez, the Inside remake stars Rachel Nichols (The Loop, Tokarev, Fantastic Four) and Laura Harring (Mulholland Drive, Inland Empire, Love in the Time of Cholera, The Punisher), who are both featured in these new images. The film is set to premiere at the upcoming FrightFest in London, although Bloody reader Fabien […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 14 Recap: Tell Me The Story

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.It's James Hurley's (James Marshall) birthday and he wants a present. Not that he's demanding it—no, no. James is cool. He's always been cool. So in that affable way of his that can be equal parts endearing and insufferable, he asks his going-on-23-year-old coworker, Freddie Sykes (Jake Wardle)—a U.K. to U.S. transplant who, like James, is a security guard at the Great Northern Hotel—to explain why he's always wearing a green gardener's glove on his right hand. "Tell me the story," he says to Freddie. The young man obliges the birthday boy with a captivating tale ("you ain't gonna believe me anyway," he prefaces) of a man in the sky called The Fireman, who told him to buy the glove,
See full article at MUBI »

Twin Peaks season 3 is exquisite, but why am I so unenthused by it?

Samuel Brace on Twin Peaks season 3…

Twin Peaks season 3 (The Return) had been something fans of the show, and of David Lynch, were dreaming of for years, and its revival has provided television viewers with some truly incredible moments, and some seriously beautiful filmmaking. But there is something about the resurrected series that just isn’t working. There is something about it that is leaving me a little indifferent to its existence.

David Lynch is a master, one of the few left in the world of cinema. His content has enraptured us for decades, inspiring a thought process regarding his work matched by very few in the business. There is nothing quite like a Lynch movie or episode of Lynch TV. The likes of Mulholland Drive (my personal favourite Lynch film), Blue Velvet, and The Lost Highway have so much to offer for those willing to have their minds twisted
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 12 Recap: Next Stop, Wendy's

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.It's great to be in the know. To have a moment (hopefully more than one) when the veil drops and, per that old song, the mysteries of love (of life) come clear. Part 12 of Mark Frost and David Lynch's revived Twin Peaks opens with just such a scene, as FBI Agent Tammy Preston (Chrysta Bell) is initiated into the Blue Rose Task Force by her superiors Albert Rosenfield (Miguel Ferrer) and Gordon Cole (Lynch). The references Albert drops—to things like "Project Blue Book" and to people like "Chet Desmond"—will be familiar to any Peaks obsessive who has pored over the original series, the Fire Walk with Me movie, or Frost's 2016 tie-in novel The Secret History of Twin Peaks. But remember that
See full article at MUBI »
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