7.1/10
1,300
28 user 56 critic

Mondovino (2004)

A documentary on the impact of globalization on the world's different wine regions.

Director:

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1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Albiera Antinori ...
Herself
Allegra Antinori ...
Herself
Lodovico Antinori ...
Himself
Piero Antinori ...
Himself
Isanette Bianchetti ...
Herself
Jean-Charles Boisset ...
Himself
Marchioness Bona ...
Herself
Michael Broadbent ...
Himself
Antonio Cabezas ...
Himself
Battista Columbu ...
Herself
Lina Columbu ...
Herself
Xavier de Eizaguirre ...
Himself
Alix de Montille ...
Herself
Etienne de Montille ...
Himself
Hubert de Montille ...
Himself
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Storyline

Explores a thesis: that the deep colored, oak-aged taste of Bordeaux wines has become the world standard, following the writing of critic Robert Parker, the magazine "Wine Spectator," the consulting work of Michel Rolland of Pomerol, and the money of Mondavi, a publicly-traded corporation based in Napa with a family history of wine making. Wine makers worldwide, many using Rolland as a consultant, pursue this structure, color, and taste - to the detriment, argue some, of wine that should reflect the character of the land where the grape is grown, including the lighter Burgundy. A few old wine makers, from Aniane, Sardinia, and Argentina offer this argument. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for brief pin-up nudity | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

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Release Date:

3 November 2004 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Borvilág  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$9,840 (USA) (25 March 2005)

Gross:

$209,618 (USA) (5 August 2005)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

During the shots showing the rail trip to Baltimore to visit wine critic Robert Parker, the word "Delaware" is superimposed, but the "PATH" logo is clearly visible on the passing building, which places the building in New Jersey. PATH is a commuter railroad operated between New Jersey and Manhattan by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and it has no facilities in Delaware. See more »

Connections

Featured in At the Movies: Episode #2.31 (2005) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Don't Ask About the Dogs
25 October 2004 | by (London) – See all my reviews

I saw this at the London Film Festival last night, apparently the shorter version. James McNally's summary of the content of the film is very good. Nossiter very deftly blends his investigation of the wine business into wider concerns about globalisation, homogenisation, the effect of the mass media, the power of capital and the need for diversity.

The film is shot on hand-held DV which some might find offputting, but which does enable Nossiter to catch people off guard on a number of occasions which probably would not have been possible using more conventional equipment.

Despite the sprawling feel of the film, the editing is very sharp, not only giving us a parade of the world's dogs, but also undercutting a number of interviewees' comments with somewhat contradictory visual images, and giving others sufficient rope to hang themselves. To a degree this evoked Michael Moore's recent work (although Nossiter operates in a more subtle way), but probably the roots of the film go back to Marcel Ophuls' "The Sorrow and the Pity", both in the way the film is constructed and in the emergence of 'salt of the earth' French peasants as the stars. De Montille pere et fils were present at the LFF screening and answered questions afterwards. We do indeed all need a little disorder - bravo Hubert!

Overall an excellent film with implications that go way beyond the world of wine into the way we construct ourselves as people, and organise our world.


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