6.6/10
13,539
104 user 72 critic

Luther (2003)

During the early 16th Century idealistic German monk Martin Luther, disgusted by the materialism in the church, begins the dialogue that will lead to the Protestant Reformation.

Director:

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4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Girolamo Aleander
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Katharina von Bora
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Frederick the Wise (as Sir Peter Ustinov)
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Pope Leo X
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Cardinal Cajetan
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Maria Simon ...
Hanna
Lars Rudolph ...
Melanchthon
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Ulrick
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von der Eck
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Storyline

Biography of Martin Luther, the 16th-century priest who led the Christian Reformation and opened up new possibilities in exploration of faith. The film begins with his vow to become a monk, and continues through his struggles to reconcile his desire for sanctification with his increasing abhorrence of the corruption and hypocrisy pervading the Church's hierarchy. He is ultimately charged with heresy and must confront the ruling cardinals and princes, urging them to make the Scriptures available to the common believer and lead the Church toward faith through justice and righteousness. Written by scgary66

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Rebel. Genius. Liberator.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disturbing images of violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

26 September 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Lutero  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

€21,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$908,446, 26 September 2003, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$5,791,328, 18 December 2003

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$23,684,104, 31 December 2004
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Stephan Schwartz is the German voice of Luther. See more »

Goofs

When Tetzel and others are burning Luther's work, you can hear a radio probably coming from the crew. See more »

Quotes

Martin Luther: Unless I am convinced by Scripture and by plain reason and not by Popes and councils who have so often contradicted themselves, my conscience is captive to the word of God. To go against conscience is neither right nor safe. I cannot and I will not recant. Here I stand. I can do no other. God help me.
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Connections

Version of Martin Luther (1983) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Beautifully done, yet still a bit sparse
30 September 2003 | by See all my reviews

The beauty of Luther is its drama and its casting. Joseph Fiennes did what he does best as the angst-riddled Luther, playing a complex and haunted character that filled the screen even in his quietest moments. The supporting cast was also fabulous, particularly the merry-in-the-face-of-danger performances by Bruno Ganz and Peter Ustinov.

What's troubling, then, about Luther is that the movie just isn't long enough to portray the story accurately, and therefore it feels not only unfinished but full of gaps. Things happen one against another, people come and go with little explanation, and yet the story marches on. Luther's mission is clear, but his purposes are so boiled down that only a few of his famous Theses are actually voiced in the movie. Shortening the story was obviously necessary for a movie, but in all, I think it acts against the dramatic effect of the film as a whole because things end up with a certain disjointed feel.

Still, the cinematography is brilliant and the acting nearly perfect. The film is worth seeing for its visual splendor (in both performance and sets) alone, and certainly as an introduction to a complex historical topic.


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