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Why ‘Lucky’ Should Earn the Late Harry Dean Stanton His First Oscar

  • Indiewire
Why ‘Lucky’ Should Earn the Late Harry Dean Stanton His First Oscar
Lucky” was never the first word that came to mind when you saw Harry Dean Stanton. On the contrary, it always seemed like he had survived something terrible. Even in the movies he shot during the ’60s and ’70s, it already looked like 90 years of life had swept through him like a windstorm, leaving just enough skin on his bones to keep the cigarette smoke from blowing out through his teeth. Stanton wasn’t cast as lucky men, but as men who appeared to have been sucked dry at some point along the way. He was typecast that way from birth, a living synonym for emptiness, and his hollowed out performance in “Paris, Texas” would eventually seal the deal.

Stanton didn’t have a problem with that. Although he died with more than 200 credits to his name, it often felt like he wasn’t playing his characters so much as his characters were playing him,
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Harry Dean Stanton

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Chicago – Harry Dean Stanton didn’t just act. He created a screen personality all of his own. The actor died last week at the age of 91, but with a 60-year career, there are a slew of highlights and shades of the man. Spike Walters, Patrick McDonald and Jon Espino of HollywoodChicago.com spotlight three films in his career.

Harry Dean Stanton in a Recent Photo

Photo credit: File Photo

With his hang dog demeanor and distinctive voice, Stanton made a mark in his career, and appeared in character roles for notable films such as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967), “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970), “The Godfather Part II” (1974), “Alien” (1979), “Escape From New York” (1981), “Pretty in Pink” (1986) and “Last Temptation of Christ” (1988). He had bigger and more up front roles in “Repo Man” (1984), “Paris, Texas” (1984), “Wild at Heart” (1990), “The Straight Story” (1999), “The Green Mile” (1999) and the upcoming “Lucky” (2017). To read the rest of the HollywoodChicago.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

‘Lean on Pete’ Review: A Striking, Shattering and Altogether Sensational Journey [Tiff]

  • Slash Film
‘Lean on Pete’ Review: A Striking, Shattering and Altogether Sensational Journey [Tiff]
Andrew Haigh’s Lean on Pete is a social realist drama of the highest order, combining the gentle pastoral touch of David Lynch’s The Straight Story with a probing sympathy for individuals on the edge of society recalling the best of the Dardenne brothers. There’s no armchair sociology here, just rich character observation steeped in a […]

The post ‘Lean on Pete’ Review: A Striking, Shattering and Altogether Sensational Journey [Tiff] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Quad Cinema to screen Harry Dean Stanton retrospective by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-09-17 18:35:34

Wim Wenders with his Paris, Texas stars Harry Dean Stanton and Nastassja Kinski Photo: Wim Wenders Foundation

The Quad Cinema in New York this Friday will kick off their retrospective, Also Starring Harry Dean Stanton, which has an impressive list of 21 films. Some of the highlights include Bertrand Tavernier's Death Watch; John Huston's Wise Blood; Ridley Scott's Alien; John Carpenter's Escape From New York and Christine; Alex Cox's Repo Man; Wim Wenders' Paris, Texas; Robert Altman's adaptation of Sam Shepard's Fool For Love; Howard Deutch's Pretty In Pink; Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation Of Christ; David Lynch's The Straight Story, and Twister, directed by Michael Almereyda.

Bertrand Tavernier's Death Watch stars Romy Schneider, Harvey Keitel, Max von Sydow, and Harry Dean Stanton Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Bill Norton's Cisco Pike, starring Kris Kristofferson in the title role with Gene Hackman,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Harry Dean Stanton Remembered as Hollywood Mourns Cult Favorite

  • MovieWeb
Harry Dean Stanton Remembered as Hollywood Mourns Cult Favorite
Harry Dean Stanton passed away yesterday at the age of 91 and Hollywood has taken to social media to pay tribute to the screen legend who starred in Alien, Twin Peaks and everything in between. According to TMZ, the actor passed away peacefully at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. Stanton's career spanned more than 6 decades in numerous television and movie projects and he was also a Navy veteran of World War II.

Harry Dean Stanton was born in Irvine, Kentucky and raised with a musical background while attending Lafayette High School and the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Stanton sings, plays guitar, and plays the harmonica. After performing theater in college, Stanton said that he had to choose between being an actor and a musician while also mentioning that he could have been a writer as well after studying journalism. He was convinced to get into acting and the rest is history.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Film News: Character Actor Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

  • HollywoodChicago.com
Los Angeles – He was often categorized as the ultimate male character actor, but Harry Dean Stanton stood out on his own, with a persona that added immediate recognition in any supporting performance, and was unforgettable when he stepped into a lead role. Stanton died on September 15, 2017, at age 91.

With his hang dog demeanor and distinctive voice, Stanton made his mark over a 60 year career, and appeared in character roles in notable films such as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967), “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970), “The Godfather Part II” (1974), “Escape From New York” (1981), “Pretty in Pink” (1986) and “Last Temptation of Christ” (1988). He had bigger and more up front roles in “Repo Man” (1984), “Paris, Texas” (1984), “Wild at Heart” (1990), “The Straight Story” (1999), “The Green Mile” (1999) and the upcoming “Lucky” (2017).

Harry Dean Stanton in a Recent Photo

Photo credit: File Photo

Harry Dean Stanton was born in Kentucky, and was a World War II veteran in the Navy,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Harry Dean Stanton, cult American actor, dies aged 91

Prolific character actor, who appeared in scores of films including Paris, Texas, Alien, Repo Man and The Straight Story, died in an La hospital on Friday

Harry Dean Stanton, the veteran American actor who ballasted generations of independent and cult films, has died aged 91. The subject of the late critic Roger Ebert’s “Stanton Walsh Rule” – “No movie featuring either Harry Dean Stanton or M Emmet Walsh in a supporting role can be altogether bad” – Stanton was famed for his ability to project his hangdog, laconic charm into minor roles, which ensured he worked continuously for over six decades. Directors who cast him include David Lynch, Sam Peckinpah, Ridley Scott, Alex Cox and Wim Wenders, but he was never nominated for an Oscar or any of the other principal acting awards.

Related: Harry Dean Stanton: gentleness, sensitivity, gallantry and painful masculinity | Peter Bradshaw

Related: Harry Dean Stanton: 'Life?
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Harry Dean Stanton, cult American actor, dies aged 91

Prolific character actor, who appeared in scores of films including Paris, Texas, Alien, Repo Man and The Straight Story, died in an La hospital on Friday

Harry Dean Stanton, the veteran American actor who ballasted generations of independent and cult films, has died aged 91. The subject of the late critic Roger Ebert’s “Stanton Walsh Rule” – “No movie featuring either Harry Dean Stanton or M Emmet Walsh in a supporting role can be altogether bad” – Stanton was famed for his ability to project his hangdog, laconic charm into minor roles, which ensured he worked continuously for over six decades. Directors who cast him include David Lynch, Sam Peckinpah, Ridley Scott, Alex Cox and Wim Wenders, but he was never nominated for an Oscar or any of the other principal acting awards.

Related: Harry Dean Stanton: gentleness, sensitivity, gallantry and painful masculinity | Peter Bradshaw

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Harry Dean Stanton, 'Repo Man' and 'Twin Peaks' Actor, Dead at 91

Harry Dean Stanton, 'Repo Man' and 'Twin Peaks' Actor, Dead at 91
Harry Dean Stanton, the legendary character actor and offbeat leading man who starred in Repo Man, Paris, Texas, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me and Big Love in a career that spanned over seven decades, has died at the age of 91.

Stanton died of natural causes in Los Angeles, Variety reports, with TMZ adding that the actor died peacefully Friday afternoon at the city's Cedars-Sinai Hospital.

Director David Lynch, who cast Stanton in Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, Wild at Heart, The Straight Story and the recent Twin Peaks: The Return,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

David Lynch on Harry Dean Stanton: ‘He Was a Great Actor and a Great Human Being’

David Lynch on Harry Dean Stanton: ‘He Was a Great Actor and a Great Human Being’
Filmmaker David Lynch has paid tribute to his friend and frequent cast member Harry Dean Stanton, who died Friday at age 91.

“The great Harry Dean Stanton has left us,” Lynch wrote. “There went a great one. There’s nobody like Harry Dean. Everyone loved him. And with good reason. He was a great actor (actually beyond great) – and a great human being – so great to be around him!!! You are really going to be missed Harry Dean!!! Loads of love to you wherever you are now!!!”

Stanton was most recently on screen this summer in Lynch’s “Twin Peaks: The Return.”

Stanton appeared in Lynch’s 1990 film “Wild at Heart” and in 1992’s “Twin Peaks: A Fire Walk With Me,” although he was not in the original “Twin Peaks” series that aired from 1990-91 on ABC. Stanton also had role in Lynch’s 1999’s “The Straight Story” and 2006’s “Inland Empire.”

In
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

  • Indiewire
Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91
Harry Dean Stanton has died at 91, reports TMZ. The actor, a screen legend who endeared himself to moviegoers for his performances in everything from “Pretty in Pink” and “The Godfather Part II” to “Alien” and “Repo Man,” passed away peacefully at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles.

Read More:‘Lucky’ Review: 90-Year-Old Harry Dean Stanton Gives a Performance for the Ages in Wry Comedy Co-Starring David Lynch — SXSW 2017

Best known as a character actor, Stanton had his share of leading roles as well. None was more moving than Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” in which he plays a grief-stricken drifter who attempts to reconnect with his former life. Stanton frequently collaborated with David Lynch, appearing in “Wild at Heart,” “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me,” “The Straight Story,” “Inland Empire,” and the just-concluded “Twin Peaks” revival.

Read More:‘Lucky’ Trailer: Harry Dean Stanton and David Lynch Reunite For This Wise Meditation on
See full article at Indiewire »

Twin Peaks: was this the long, perfect goodbye from David Lynch?

Twin Peaks: the Return was the culmination of Lynch’s life’s work. But its last, weary moments were surely proof that he’s bowing out on us

David Lynch’s debut Eraserhead was the greatest home movie ever made. Shot over five years in a disused stable block behind the American Film Institute where the director was living at the time, it was painstakingly constructed frame by frame by a group of committed friends – the very definition of a labour of love. Exactly 40 years later, Lynch has just completed his most personal project since. Twin Peaks: the Return may have had a starry cast, cutting-edge digital effects and an 18-hour run time. But at heart, it was just another home movie: the work of an artist coming full circle, incorporating everything he’s learned in four decades as a filmmaker back into the hands-on, Diy template he established with his first film.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Why 'Twin Peaks: The Return' Was the Most Groundbreaking TV Series Ever

Why 'Twin Peaks: The Return' Was the Most Groundbreaking TV Series Ever
When some phrases pass through the prism of Twin Peaks, you can never hear them the same way again. "Damn good coffee" is one; "Gotta light?" is another. We'll submit a third candidate, one that the just-concluded third season of David Lynch and Mark Frost's supernatural murder-mystery masterpiece has marked for permanent retirement from the critical vocabulary: "Like nothing else on television." The TV landscape remains full of singular, spectacular shows, Peak TV fatigue be damned. But just as the original Twin Peaks inspired visionary showrunners from David Chase
See full article at Rolling Stone »

David Lynch Almost Directed ‘Fast Times at Ridgemont High,’ Reveals Cameron Crowe

  • Indiewire
David Lynch Almost Directed ‘Fast Times at Ridgemont High,’ Reveals Cameron Crowe
Fast Times at Ridgemont High” turns 35 tomorrow, a milestone Variety has marked by speaking to director Amy Heckerling and screenwriter Cameron Crowe. Among the revelations: the fact that David Lynch, who was also offered directing duties on “Return of the Jedi” at around the same time, was approached to helm the classic teen comedy. “I had a meeting with David Lynch,” says Crowe, apparently on the recommendation of Universal exec Thom Mount.

“He had a very wry smile on his face as I sat talking with him,” continues Crowe, who won an Oscar for writing “Almost Famous.” “He went and read it. We met again. He was very, very sweet about it, but slightly perplexed we thought of him. He said this was a really nice story but ‘it’s not really the
See full article at Indiewire »

'Twin Peaks' Recap: In Arms' Way

'Twin Peaks' Recap: In Arms' Way
What's worse: Crushing a person's skull or crushing their spirit? The back-from-the-dead Twin Peaks has seen its fair share of the former violation, courtesy of the supernaturally strong denizens of the Black Lodge. When those demonic entities are around – whether they're Woodsmen assaulting radio-station employees or Dale Cooper's evil doppelganger shattering a rival criminal's face with a single punch after an arm-wrestling bout – no cranium is safe. And then there's the long, wordless scene starring Big Ed Hurley (Everett McGill, making his revival debut), which features no monsters and no
See full article at Rolling Stone »

New Trailer For ‘Lucky’ Starring Harry Dean Stanton & David Lynch Faces The Truth

  • The Playlist
David Lynch fans are currently enjoying puzzling out just what the heck is going on in the new season of “Twin Peaks,” but if they need to take a break from the multiple Dale Coopers, they’ll want to track down “Lucky.” The director takes a small role in the film that’s led by his old pal Harry Dean Stanton (“Wild At Heart,” “Inland Empire,” “The Straight Story,” “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me“) but makes quite an impression nonetheless.

Continue reading New Trailer For ‘Lucky’ Starring Harry Dean Stanton & David Lynch Faces The Truth at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

"Twin Peaks," Episode 7 Recap: …And That's Enough Said About That

  • MUBI
Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.So that's how David Lynch does an info dump. First, with a cheeky, knowing scene featuring the brothers Horne: "Jerry, what's going on?" asks Ben (Richard Beymer) after his cannabis-infused sibling (David Patrick Kelly) phones him from the woods. "I think I'm high!…I don't know where I am!" Jerry screams, perhaps speaking for a good subsection of the Twin Peaks revival audience, who have, over the six prior installments, been given only glimpses of a larger picture. Narrative momentum comes in asides; the more prevalent longueurs are reserved for atmosphere and mood, for full immersion in apparent stasis.Part 7 shakes things up, following the brotherly freak-out with several story reveals that come in quick succession. But there's a niggling sense throughout all the
See full article at MUBI »

Great Job, Internet!: Explore what David Lynch’s films say about Americana

  • The AV Club
At this point, someone who hasn’t even spent much time with the films of David Lynch knows, roughly, what “Lynchian” means. It might just scan as “weird” or “dark,” but then, after watching a few films, the throughlines become clearer: noir surrealism, mundanity and the macabre, and those wonderful, ominous ambient drones. A new video from ScreenPrism buzzes through Lynch’s history, starting with his early work as a painter, providing a solid primer on his filmography as well as a thesis that the primary throughline is his take on Americana.

From the post-industrial wasteland of Philadelphia in Eraserhead through the cross-country odyssey of The Straight Story, and now, the many locations of Twin Peaks’ third season, Lynch has remained obsessed with the idea that there’s another America hiding beneath the surface. It helps to explain why his films have resonated so well, and why the term “Lynchian
See full article at The AV Club »

‘Mulholland Drive’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Naomi Watts, Laura Harring, Justin Theroux, Ann Miller | Written and Directed by David Lynch

Re-released to coincide with the new Twin Peaks series, it’s apt that Mulholland Drive was originally conceived as a TV pilot. Perhaps it’s for the best it ended up in (relatively) short form. The film, weighing in at 2.5 hours, is an epic mind-bender on its own terms, and there’s barely a wasted frame.

It begins with a car accident on Mulholland Drive. A woman, who will become known as Rita (Laura Harring), survives with a knock to the head. She stumbles away and hides in an empty house. The house belongs to Aunt Ruth, whose niece Betty (Naomi Watts) arrives the next day. She’s come to L.A. with the dream of an acting career. Rita and Betty become friends. But Rita can’t remember anything – not even her real name
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Soundtracks Of Our Lives: Lost Highway put David Lynch onto America’s car stereos

  • The AV Club
If Twin Peaks brought David Lynch into America’s living rooms, then Lost Highway put him on America’s car stereos. The film itself is a heady mindfuck of a neo-noir tale structured around the idea of a Möbius strip, a reassurance that network TV had not impeded Lynch’s ability to dive into the deeper, darker waters of his subconscious. Save for The Straight Story, none of Lynch’s films can be called “heartwarming,” but the tone of Lost Highway is especially chilling, eschewing tongue-in-cheek Americana for snuff films, graphic head wounds, and a sinister Mystery Man pale as death itself. Like its predecessors Wild At Heart—which debuted to mixed reception at Cannes, despite winning the Palme D’Or—and Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, critics and audiences didn’t seem to know what to make of the film, and it left theaters after a modest three-week
See full article at The AV Club »
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