7.2/10
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The Madness of King George (1994)

A meditation on power and the metaphor of the body of state, based on the real episode of dementia experienced by George III [now suspected a victim of porphyria, a blood disorder]. As he ... See full summary »

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(play), (screenplay)
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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Won 1 Oscar. Another 15 wins & 18 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Charlotte Curley ...
Peter Bride-Kirk ...
Royal Children
Eve Camden ...
Royal Children
Thomas Copeland ...
Royal Children
Joanna Hall ...
Royal Children
Cassandra Halliburton ...
Royal Children
Russell Martin ...
Royal Children
Natalie Palys ...
Royal Children
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David Leon ...
Martin Julier ...
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Storyline

A meditation on power and the metaphor of the body of state, based on the real episode of dementia experienced by George III [now suspected a victim of porphyria, a blood disorder]. As he loses his senses, he becomes both more alive and more politically marginalized; neither effect desirable to his lieutenants, who jimmy the rules to avoid a challenge to regal authority, raising the question of who is really in charge. Written by Dan Hartung <dhartung@mcs.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

His Majesty was all powerful and all knowing. But he wasn't quite all there.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic elements | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

28 December 1994 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La folie du roi George  »

Box Office

Gross:

$15,238,994 (USA)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(8 channels)|

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There had been some question as to whether Nigel Hawthorne should be cast in the movie, since he was 65 at the time of filming and King George III was only fifty at the time of his first bout of insanity. See more »

Goofs

When Lady Pembroke first discusses Dr. Willis with Pitt, Pitt reaches out for Lady Pembroke's note twice. See more »

Quotes

Footman: The government is still in bed.
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Soundtracks

Zadok the Priest
(uncredited)
Music by George Frideric Handel (as G H Handel)
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User Reviews

 
Wonderful, entertaining Britflick
18 February 2004 | by (London, UK) – See all my reviews

I've recently revisited the third Blackadder series. Nigel Hawthorne doesn't play his George III quite as spoony as that of the Curtis/Elton BBC series who wants his son to marry a pot plant, but it's close.

The film works because of three things. First - always first - is Alan Bennett's screenplay which is succinct and hilariously funny. It is also unbearably sad at choice moments. The actors - the second success story of the project - throw themselves at the pathos as furiously as at the comedy. There's camp and potty humour (literally) juxtaposed with the bare quoting of King Lear and it all works.

Thirdly, there is an attention to the detail which goes beyond costume and design. Hytner has got his cast to play out humans inside 18th century character roles - there's no false reverence or mannered acting.

Nigel Hawthorne is brilliant, playing out a human despite the vastly inflated ego he has to inhabit either side of sanity. All others aspire to this lead, with only Ian Holm (naturally, as his temporarily domineering doctor) matching it. 7/10


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