Based on a true story, one woman takes on the U.S. military and General Dynamics; maker of the F-16, thought to be the very best tactical fighter in the world. Air Force Captain Theodore T.... See full summary »

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Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 9 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Janet Harduvel
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Leo Morrone
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Ted Harduvel
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Casey 'Z' Zankowski
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Mary Sciales
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Acton Ryder
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Dr. Carl Haller
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Terry North
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Bill Decker
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Col. Hewson
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Carol North
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Col. John Patterson
Cassy Friel ...
Kiki Harduval
Christopher John Fields ...
Charlie Reeves
...
Joe
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Storyline

Based on a true story, one woman takes on the U.S. military and General Dynamics; maker of the F-16, thought to be the very best tactical fighter in the world. Air Force Captain Theodore T. Harduvel was one of the best F-16 pilots the U.S. had to offer. After much digging, Janet Harduvel discovers a joint military and General Dynamic cover-up. She proves to be unwavering in her search for the truth to clear his name. Written by Richard Jones <rjo339@swbell.net>

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Taglines:

The Enemy Isn't Always On The Other Side. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

30 May 1992 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Alas de justicia  »

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Did You Know?


Goofs

The tail codes on the F-16s, which the Air Force uses to identify the base from which an aircraft flies, constantly change in flight on what is supposed to be the same aircraft. In some shots, the jets are correctly identified with a "WP" tail code for Kunsan Air Base, Korea, the base at which Capt. Ted Harduvel was assigned at the time of his accident. In other shots, the same aircraft is incorrectly identified with a "WA" tail code. This is the tail code for Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, which had no part in the story of this film. See more »

Quotes

Janet Harduvel: [At Ted Harduvel's gravesite] I know it wasn't Ted's fault. I'm not coming back here until I prove it.
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Crazy Credits

On appeal, the court ruled that although Janet Harduvel had presented substantial evidence of design defect in the F-16, General Dynamics was protected from liability as a government contractor. Accordingly, the $3.1 million damage award was overturned. Ted Harduvel's name remains clear. To date, more than 140 F-16s have crashed from a variety of causes. More than 40 pilots have died. The Air Force maintains that the F-16 is "the safest single engine fighter of all time". Janet Harduvel is continuing her legal battle against General Dynamics. See more »

Soundtracks

For One Moment
Composed by Deborah Holland (as Debbie Holland) & Stewart Copeland
Performed by Deborah Holland (as Debbie Holland)
Debbie Holland appears courtesy of I.R.S. Records
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User Reviews

Low-Class Floozie Fights Injustice
5 August 2003 | by (Deming, New Mexico, USA) – See all my reviews

There were a spate of movies that came out over the course of a decade or so in which ordinary women, rather than saints, saw injustice in the system and fought against it. In "Marie," Sissy Spacek was the woman next door who just happened to stumble over state corruption and righted it despite resistance. That was in, I think, 1984. A few years later, Jodie Foster turned in a first-rate performance as a victimized woman who fights the legal bureaucracy in "The Accused." The innovate feature of "Accused" was that Foster played a young woman who was not only less than saintly but positively low-class. The film won Foster an Academy Award and it must have light a few light bulbs among the MBAs who greenlight projects, because in 2000, Julia Roberts won accolades for a similar part.

This one, starring Laura Dern, and featuring Loggia, Spano, and perennial heavy Rooker, among others, came in between -- 1992. And it really is derivative. Vincent Spano is a sexy pilot and Dern is a sexy waitress in a saloon. She brash and vulgar. She talks back to authority figures and smartasses smug housewives. She smokes. She wears her golden hair up in a great big pile on top of her head. She wears cheap-looking clothes, and she's easy. We can all recognize her as exactly the type of girl a Captain in the United States Air Force, an officer and a gentleman by act of Congress, would propose marriage to.

But, not to worry. The producers and writers must have realized that if they wanted to hook the female audience, this coarseness could only be taken so far. Therefore, as the movie progresses, so does Dern. She remains an outspoken woman, of course, but her demeanor and grooming change, gradually, until by the end she is perfectly fashionable by any middle-class definition.

It's not Dern's fault. She gives the role everything she's got and is quite good, throwing her ectomorphic body with those endlessly long legs around so carelessly. Her face is an interesting object as well, long and thin, with appealing blonde hair and darker brows and lashes. Spano is handsome too, I suppose, although we see a bit more of him than we need to perhaps. Robert Loggia is his dependable self. Rooker plays a mixed-up family friend who's heart is in the right place.

General Dynamics is the villain here. Spano's F-16 nosedives into the ground. The Air Force deems it pilot error, but Dern, the faithful wife, knows there is what she calls "a cover up." And so there is. General Dynamics is taken to court. No power on earth could force me to reveal who wins the case.

The plot is conventionally structured. The music stays in the background. The location shooting, in Southern California, isn't bad. It's derivative, yes, but so were several films that followed "Accused." That floozy business is the most interesting part of the pattern, though, and this made-for-TV movie gets rid of it pretty quickly.


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