6.5/10
5,696
72 user 32 critic

Electric Dreams (1984)

PG | | Comedy, Drama, Music | 20 July 1984 (USA)
An artificially intelligent PC and his human owner find themselves in a romantic rivalry over a woman.

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4,948 ( 26)

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Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Edgar (voice)
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Alan Polonsky ...
Wendy Miller ...
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Holly De Jong ...
Stella Maris ...
Mary Doran ...
Diana Choy ...
Jim Steck ...
Gary Pettinger ...
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Storyline

Miles buys himself a state-of-the-art computer that starts expressing thoughts and emotions after a having champagne spilled down on him. Things start getting out of hand when both Miles and Edgar, how the computer calls himself, fall in love with Madeline, an attractive neighbour. Written by Robert Zeithammel <zeit@cip.physik.uni-muenchen.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Meet Edgar. He'll make you sing, make you dance, make you laugh, make you cry, make you jealous, make you nuts. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

20 July 1984 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Amor é Música  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$1,009,586 (USA) (22 July 1984)

Gross:

$2,193,612 (USA)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the dream musical sequence, Edgar the computer dreams of electric sheep jumping an electric fence, whilst Miles dozes off to sleep. The scene is quite likely inspired by author Philip K. Dick's (1968) science fiction novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" Dick's stories typically focus on the fragile nature of what is real and the construction of personal identity. This is borne out by Miles', "I'm not what I seem to be". See more »

Goofs

Miles and Edgar both quote the wrong release dates to each other for the respective Sleeping Beauty and Cinderalla movies they are referencing. See more »

Quotes

Edgar: Mel-o-dy. Hmm.
Budweiser commerical: [singing] This Bud's for you...
Edgar: Too slow.
Volkswagon commercial: [singing, with text] Volkswagon does it, again.
Edgar: Too simple.
Dr. Pepper commercial: [singing] Hold out for Dr. Pepper.
Edgar: Too long.
Pepsi commercial: [singing] Get that Pepsi spirit. Drink it in, drink it in, drink it in.
Edgar: Yes! Now, backwards.
[Jeff Lynne's song "Video" begins]
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Dedicated to the memory of the UNIVAC I See more »

Connections

Referenced in Adjust Your Tracking (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Happy Trails to You
Written by Dale Evans
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User Reviews

Being John Malkovich for the Eighties
20 February 2001 | by (Liverpool, England) – See all my reviews

When I first saw 'Being John Malkovich', I didn't really know much about - it was a while since I'd been to the cinema because of work and I went to see it on the strength of John Cusack. As I sat in that cinema full of bored teenagers, watching the story unfold, I was amazed at how similar an experience it actually was to the first film I really fell in love with, 'Electric Dreams'.

I've never been completely sure what I especially liked about the film. Virginia Madsen certainly has a big sister / first crush quality, with her woolly jumpers and body wrapped around a cello. Lenny Van Dollen is certainly as good an actor as anyone whose worked in this kind of film and offers work of quite subtle range. And the computer is heartbreaking. And the music is lovely. This is perhaps a film which is uncriticisable because it captures a time in life so beautifully.

Made in 1984, 'Dreams' has a plot similar in scope to 'Malkovich'. Miles subordinating of the newly sentient computer parallel's Craig Schwartz control of the film actor. As the computer operator uses Edger to woo the love of both their lives, so the puppeteer controls Malkovich to get into the panties of his 'business partner'.

There is no doubt the film has dated, although in its own way it uses visual techniques which at the time must have seemed as extreme as the flourishes of the latter film. Its use of pop video, in the sequences of high emotion, especially in the scene of where Miles is chased around the house, are at least echoed in the chase sequence at the heart of 'Malkovich'.

With all this in mind, its perhaps a time to re-assess this film as more than the fluff its previously been thought of as being.


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