6.8/10
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276 user 156 critic

TRON (1982)

A computer hacker is abducted into the digital world and forced to participate in gladiatorial games where his only chance of escape is with the help of a heroic security program.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (story) | 1 more credit »
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2,559 ( 90)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Tony Stephano ...
Peter / Sark's Lieutenant
Craig Chudy ...
Warrior #1
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Warrior #2 (as Vince Deadrick)
Sam Schatz ...
Expert Disc Warrior
Jackson Bostwick ...
Head Guard
David S. Cass Sr. ...
Factory Guard (as Dave Cass)
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Guard #1
Bob Neill ...
Guard #2
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Storyline

Hacker/arcade owner Kevin Flynn is digitally broken down into a data stream by a villainous software pirate known as Master Control and reconstituted into the internal, 3-D graphical world of computers. It is there, in the ultimate blazingly colorful, geometrically intense landscapes of cyberspace, that Flynn joins forces with Tron to outmaneuver the Master Control Program that holds them captive in the equivalent of a gigantic, infinitely challenging computer game. Written by Anthony Pereyra {hypersonic91@yahoo.com}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In the future video game battles will be a matter of life or death. See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 July 1982 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

TRON  »

Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$33,000,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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(70 mm prints)| (35 mm prints)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The "pulsing" flicker in some scenes in the computer world were the accidental result of a mix up during production. Each B&W 65mm frame of the film was printed on 20"x16" Kodalith high contrast film as high contrast positives which were then used to print as high contrast negatives. These positives and negatives were then colorized and used in the film. The Kodalith was produced by Kodak in the necessary size as a special order and the film boxes numbered in order of each batch produced so that there was a consistent film speed if used in order. However, this was misunderstood by the Tron crew and they were used in any random order which resulted in some frames being brighter/darker than others and resulted in the flickers as the film speed varied. Once this was found out, the film was used in order of production to minimize the effect, but in the end the producers actually added in more flickers and "zinger" sounds to represent the computer world glitching as Steven Lisberger described it. However, he digitally removed them from the 2011 Blu-ray release as they were not in his original vision of the film and he believed they detracted from the quality. See more »

Goofs

In Flynn's Arcade, a couple of kids are "playing" pinball machines that aren't switched on (visible at the top left of the screen in the overhead shots). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Boy in Video Game Arcade: All right, give me room. Here we go.
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Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits, save for the production companies (and the opening prologue in the English language foriegn version.) For the title, a pair of lightning bolts flare, forming a brilliant point of light, where various parts coalesce to form a human figure. The point of light flares, revealing the title TRON, which an electric point of light shimmering in the "O". The title TRON rushes toward the camera, rotating around the "O", and as the title gets closer, a landscape of three dimensional circuitry appears within the letters themselves. As the camera dives in, it levels off, and the circuitry turns into the lights of a cityscape, dissolving into the establishing shot of the arcade. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Kingdom Hearts Re:coded (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Only Solutions
Written and Performed by Journey
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User Reviews

 
Someone had to try it
19 September 2000 | by (Mexico City) – See all my reviews

"Tron" is not for everyone.

This first sentence should make you think that "Tron" is a cult movie. Well, maybe it is. My parents abhor it. My sister detests it. But my friends, who were born in the early 70s (very early, actually) and me see it as an amazing piece of work.

Is it stunning? Yes, even though more than half of the film is colorized b&w. Is it computer animated? Yes, although I am betting your home PC might be able to render the images you will see there without any problem. Maybe not in real time, but almost. Is it special? You bet. Even though CGI had been tried before, Tron took it to the next logical step: creating whole CGI rendered scenes (e.g. tanks, cycles, Recognizers).

The film is confusing at times, and 18 years later you can safely say the script wasn't actually the best. On the light of the Internet, though, it all makes a lot more sense, and it plainly demonstrates that the writers really loved computers. In fact, they were so ahead of their times that I am betting too many people who saw it the first time didn't understand it. That was its failure: only computer geeks could get the whole picture (no pun intended).

Still, I guess Toy Story I and II are the direct development of Tron. And that cannot be bad in any way.


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