A dramatization of the controversial trial concerning the right for Neo-Nazis to march in the predominately Jewish community of Skokie.

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Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Max Feldman
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Herb Lewisohn
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Abbot Rosen
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Bertha Feldman
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Bert Silverman
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Police Chief Arthur Buchanan
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Frank Collin
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Mayor Albert J. Smith
Stephen D. Newman ...
Aryeh Neier
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David Hamlin
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Morton Weisman
Marin Kanter ...
Janet Feldman
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JDL Girl
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Sol Goldstein
Ruth Nelson ...
Grandma Jannsen
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Storyline

This is the story of some Modern day Nazi activists who plan to march through the predominantly Jewish community of Skokie. The town officials tell the citizens to ignore them cause there's nothing that they can do. But one citizen (Kaye) who's a death camp survivor says that he was told this nearly forty years ago in Germany and before he knew it he was in a concentration camp. He says this time if they march, he will not ignore them; he will take action. So, the mayor does what he can to stop them, so the Nazi's leader (Dzundza) goes to the ACLU, and the Jewish lawyer (Rubinstein) he speaks to, says that this is a violation of the First Ammendment and takes the case to court. Written by <rcs0411@yahoo.com>

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Plot Keywords:

jewish | march | nazi | aclu | neo nazi | See All (21) »

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Drama

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Release Date:

17 November 1981 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A túlélő  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This would be the final appearance of Danny Kaye before motion picture cameras, and the last of only two dramatic performances. The other performance being the "Ragpicker," in the 1969 film The Madwoman of Chaillot (1969) starring Katharine Hepburn. See more »

Goofs

One actress seen in the synagogue protesting the Nazi march is seen later in the ACLU office answering phones and defending the Nazi march. See more »

Quotes

Herb Lewisohn: Doesn't it feel kind of funny?
Bert Silverman: What?
Herb Lewisohn: I mean, you argued the first amendment for us before. In 68, the democratic convention. It's kind of surprising finding you arguing for prior restraint.
Bert Silverman: Well, it's surprising to find you, a Jew, arguing in the defense of a Nazi like Collin.
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User Reviews

 
A powerful movie (even though it was made for television)
28 December 2003 | by See all my reviews

To me, this was an excellent movie. This was one of my favorite movies of all time. Forget Schindler's list, to me this movie was a much better in certain aspects for emotion. One of the best scenes in this motion picture (one that in the 4 minutes it takes to play invokes more emotion from me as the viewer than all Schindler's list) is where Danny Kaye as Max Feldman answers his daughter's question about what happened to her grandparents. Max and his wife - holocaust survivors, have kept the horrors of the camps from their daughter. She has very little knowledge of what happened and at 13 or 14 she asks questions. Danny Kaye (Max) takes the time (against his wife's wishes) to finally tell his daughter. The strength and power of this single scene rests with the unemotional and matter of fact way that Max explains the nature of the death camp to his daughter. No emotion on the part of Max - - the character is breaking up inside yet is telling his daughter what the Nazis did to his parents in a manner to spare her the emotion. This while his wife is listening from around the corner quietly falling to pieces. You know the deep emotion that he has with the issues when he attends a meeting to discuss the question of Nazi's marching in Skokie with the vehemence and passion he holds on the issue. Yet he holds back this emotion with his daughter. Like I said, this few minutes of the movie is more powerful than the total Schindler's list - in my opinion. The full movie has its flaws, and covers the 1st amendment issues of American Nazi's right to march in detail, covering all sides of the issue. But this is a powerful movie and shows the depth of Danny Kaye's acting talents. A very surprising made for television movie about a very interesting topic. It is well done and very unlike Hollywood today.


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