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The Howling (1981)

R | | Horror | 10 April 1981 (USA)
After a bizarre and near fatal encounter with a serial killer, a television newswoman is sent to a remote mountain resort whose residents may not be what they seem.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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ON DISC
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Margie Impert ...
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Lew Landers (as Jim McKrell)
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Older Cop
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Storyline

In a red light district, newswoman Karen White is bugged by the police, investigating serial killer Eddie Quist, who has been molesting her through phone calls. After police officers find them in a peep-show cabin and shoot Eddie, Karen becomes emotionally disturbed and loses her memory. Hoping to conquer her inner demons, she heads for the Colony, a secluded retreat where the creepy residents are rather too eager to make her feel at home. There also seems to be a bizarre connection between Eddie Quist and this supposedly safe haven. And when, after nights of being tormented by unearthly cries, Karen ventures into the forest and makes a terrifying discovery. Written by Tim Kretschmann <Tim.K@VirComm.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

All your nightmares are about to be transformed into one single inescapable fear! See more »

Genres:

Horror

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

10 April 1981 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Aullidos  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$17,986,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This took about four years from the time Gary Brandner's novel was published in 1977 and to when this film was made. See more »

Goofs

Slim Pickens is shot twice with the shots coming almost on top of each other in quick succession. However, he is shot with a manual bolt-action rifle making that impossible. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dr. George Waggner: Repression. Repression is the father of neurosis, of self-hatred. Now, stress results when we fight against our impulses. We've all heard people talk about animal magnetism, the natural man. the noble savage, as if we'd lost something valuable in our long evolution into civilized human beings. Now there's a good reason for this.
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Crazy Credits

At the very end of the credits, there is a brief clip from The Wolf Man (1941). See more »

Connections

Followed by The Howling: Reborn (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Howling Chicken
by Rick Fienhage and Joyce Fienhage
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Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Joe Dante's The Howling has plenty of scares throughout
20 April 2007 | by See all my reviews

Earlier this week, I saw An American Werewolf in London in its entirety for the first time in my life. Now I just saw another werewolf movie from 1981 from beginning to end in my first viewing: The Howling. With direction from Joe Dante and a script co-written by John Sayles, this flick was almost as awesome as the John Landis' England-based comedy-horror pic. Dee Wallace, who would later be better known as the mother in E.T., is fine as the television reporter who is recovering from an unpleasant encounter with a serial killer as she and her husband (Christopher Stone) take in a retreat in the woods with a community waiting there for them. Many effective werewolf transformation scenes abound although some may take so long that you want to laugh after a while. Still, good support from Robert Picardo, Dennis Dugan, Kevin McCarthy, Slim Pickens, Patrick Macnee, John Carradine, and in cameos, Roger Corman, Sayles, Forrest J. Ackerman, and frequent Dante regular Dick Miller as Walter Paisley, a name he first used in Corman's A Bucket of Blood. Great use of scares throughout up to the ironic finale. So give The Howling a try with maybe An American Werewolf in London as its second feature...P.S. Like AWIL, there's references to The Wolf Man with clips shown on a television screen and a picture of Lon Chaney, Jr. in a cabin somewhere.


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