Eraserhead (1977) - News Poster

(1977)

News

Beauty vs Beast: Dreaming of Electric Sheep

Jason from Mnpp here... or am I? Is this me? Am I here? So many existential questions here on the eve of the release of Blade Runner 2049 this weekend and all I have is a "Beauty vs Beast" poll to face them down with. Y'all gotta help me suss it out! Are we a Deckard (Harrison Ford) or are we a Pris (Daryl Hannah)? And is this the version of life with the voiceover and the unicorns or isn't it? I am so confused...

Previously Last week we wished David Lynch's Eraserhead a happy 40th birthday, and in a delightfully close contest you came down on the side of the pulsating little baby pod thing - a testament to a special effect that Lynch himself steadfastly refuses to label as such, I'd say. Said Nick T:

"Baby, because I asked my dad if he resonated with Henry's parental
See full article at FilmExperience »

David Lynch as Actor: How His Onscreen Persona Has Evolved From ‘The Cleveland Show’ to ‘Lucky’

  • Indiewire
David Lynch as Actor: How His Onscreen Persona Has Evolved From ‘The Cleveland Show’ to ‘Lucky’
Here’s a strange thought: David Lynch has been in front of the camera more often in the last 10 years than he’s been behind it. Though rarely thought of as an actor in the same manner as other on-camera directors, Lynch has appeared not only in several of his own projects — most recently the “Twin Peaks” revival, in which his Gordon Cole became one of the main characters — but an expectedly far-flung range of others as well. Though he only lends his voice to some of them, he imbues each role with his nonpareil essence.

Read More:Why ‘Lucky’ Should Earn the Late Harry Dean Stanton His First Oscar

Lynch made no feature-length films or TV series in the 11 long years between the release of “Inland Empire” and this new “Twin Peaks,” but he did grace us with his presence onscreen several times. Most prominently — and weirdly, and hilariously — that
See full article at Indiewire »

Exploring Nowhere: The Weird Worldbuilding of ‘Eraserhead’

By Jacob Oller

David Lynch’s constructions are coherent in their craziness. raserhead is unforgettable. It’s also unforgettably weird, a trip to another dimension just off-center from our own. That uncanny creation is a David Lynch specialty that the director has forged outside of its typical homes of fantasy and sci-fi (except for Dune, which is what happens when […]

The article Exploring Nowhere: The Weird Worldbuilding of ‘Eraserhead’ appeared first on Film School Rejects.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Beauty vs Beast: Listen to the Lady in the Radiator

Jason from Mnpp here -- this Thursday David Lynch's cult masterpiece Eraserhead is marking its 40th anniversary! 40 years have passed and I still haven't seen anything like it. Even among Lynch's work it still feels singular - you know how there's the blue key in Mulholland Drive that opens the little box? Sometimes I feel like Eraserhead is the blue key. Everything flows through it. It's his beautiful brain's Rosetta Stone, but good luck deciphering it. Anyway let's celebrate the film with this week's round of "Beauty vs Beast" shall we...

Previously You guys gave James Marsden a very happy birthday week, giving his Enchanted performance a whopping 85% against Patrick Dempsey's. That's one of the soundest beatings I think we've ever had. Said PoliVamp:

"Prince Edward all the way. He's so enthusiastically sincere that, even if the sex was terrible, he'd still find someway to make sure you enjoyed it.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Review: “David Lynch—The Art Life” (2016; Directed by Jon Nguyen, Rick Barnes, Olivia Neergaard-Holm); Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“Portrait Of The Artist As A Young And Old Man”

By Raymond Benson

David Lynch is today’s foremost surrealist. In many ways, he has taken up the mantle begun by those artists of the 1920s who attempted to present in tangible, visual forms the juxtapositions, bizarre logic, and beauty/horror of dreams. Salvador Dalí, Luis Buñuel, Man Ray, Germaine Dulac, René Magritte—to name a few.

Most people know Lynch from his films, but as this thoughtful and insightful documentary reveals, he is and has always been primarily a painter. Lynch began his career in the “art life” studying and practicing fine art… and he sort of fell into filmmaking along the way. Even today, despite his recent foray back into television with Twin Peaks—The Return on Showtime, Lynch spends most of his time in his home studio drinking coffee, smoking cigarettes, and painting.

The film is narrated
See full article at CinemaRetro »

David Lynch: The Art Life

David Lynch: The Art Life

Blu-ray

Criterion

2016 / 1:75 / Street Date September 26, 2017

Starring the One and Only David Lynch

Cinematography: Jason S.

Film Editor: Olivia Neergaard-Holm

Produced by Josefine Bothe

Music: Jonatan Bengta

Directed by Jon Nguyen, Rick Barnes and Olivia Neergaard-Holm

Twin Peaks: The Return recently ended its 18 hour run on Showtime and with that it can be said that the 41 year old cable channel finally made good on its name. Directed by David Lynch and co-written with Mark Frost, The Return see-sawed from soaring fly-overs of Manhattan and Vegas to suffocating dungeons infested with oily-skinned ghosts. It was pictorial storytelling on a grand scale, a work of epic surrealism that challenged the capabilities of any ordinary television screen.

If Lynch and Frost viewed the 1990 incarnation of Twin Peaks as a relatively benign first draft populated by lovable eccentrics, Twin Peaks: The Return could be seen as a take-no-prisoners revision,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Twin Peaks: was this the long, perfect goodbye from David Lynch?

Twin Peaks: the Return was the culmination of Lynch’s life’s work. But its last, weary moments were surely proof that he’s bowing out on us

David Lynch’s debut Eraserhead was the greatest home movie ever made. Shot over five years in a disused stable block behind the American Film Institute where the director was living at the time, it was painstakingly constructed frame by frame by a group of committed friends – the very definition of a labour of love. Exactly 40 years later, Lynch has just completed his most personal project since. Twin Peaks: the Return may have had a starry cast, cutting-edge digital effects and an 18-hour run time. But at heart, it was just another home movie: the work of an artist coming full circle, incorporating everything he’s learned in four decades as a filmmaker back into the hands-on, Diy template he established with his first film.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

George Lucas Wanted David Lynch to Direct Return of the Jedi

  • MovieWeb
George Lucas Wanted David Lynch to Direct Return of the Jedi
David Lynch almost directed Return of the Jedi. Yes, it's true. Who knows what George Lucas was thinking at the time. But Lynch did meet with the creator of the Star Wars franchise. And as David tells it, the experience gave him an immediate headache. There was no way this was happening. And it didn't. But it's interesting to think about what could have been.

This past Sunday, the Twin Peaks saga came to a close after 18 amazing new episodes. All directed by one of the two masterminds behind the cult series, acclaimed filmmaker David Lynch. And it still has fans confused, elated, and debating what it all means. David Lynch and co-creator Mark Frost are auteur artists in every sense of the word. And what they pulled off is as audacious as anything that has ever been attempted before. It's true art, and something we don't often see in
See full article at MovieWeb »

After Soderbergh: See the Top 10 Box Office Track Records of Classic Indie Filmmakers

  • Indiewire
After Soderbergh: See the Top 10 Box Office Track Records of Classic Indie Filmmakers
In a career that began with “sex lies and videotape” in 1989, “Logan Lucky” is Steven Soderbergh’s 26th theatrical release. It will extend his record as the top-grossing American director to come out of the independent scene in its formative years — a period we’ll define as 1975 (Joan Micklin Silver’s “Hester Street”) through 1992 (Quentin Tarantino’s debut, “Reservoir Dogs”).

To be clear, Soderbergh’s an outlier; his billion-dollar box office dwarfs every other indie filmmaker. However, looking at the performance of his contemporaries who got their start in that indie film movement, you may be surprised at who’s on the list. (Note: “Outside wide release” means less than 1,000 screens. Also, the list doesn’t include directors like Sam Raimi and Abel Ferrara, who have independent roots but were not discovered via the film festival/arthouse pathway, or Alan Rudolph, another significant ’80s figure; he started in horror films in the early ’70s.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Film Stage Show Classic – Eraserhead

Thanks to our Patreon contributors, we have a special episode of The Film Stage Show today. After hitting a reward goal, we present the first episode of The Film Stage Show Classic where Michael Snydel, Bill Graham, and I discuss David Lynch’s debut film Eraserhead, released 40 years ago this year. If you liked this episode, and want to hear more in this style, become a patron today, including more great rewards! Also, for more Lynch-related discussion, listen to our Twin Peaks podcast, Dark Mood Woods.

Subscribe on iTunes or see below to stream download (right-click and save as…).

M4A: The Film Stage Show Classic – Eraserhead

00:00 – 01:13:32 – Eraserhead Discussion

The Film Stage is supported by Mubi, a curated online cinema streaming a selection of exceptional independent, classic, and award-winning films from around the world. Each day, Mubi hand-picks a new gem and you have one month to watch it.
See full article at The Film Stage »

How Sean Penn Saved Fast Times at Ridgemont High from Being a Disaster

  • MovieWeb
How Sean Penn Saved Fast Times at Ridgemont High from Being a Disaster
In addition to saving Brooke Shields from drowning, Jeff Spicoli also saved Fast Times at Ridgemont High. The cult classic high school movie is celebrating its 35th anniversary and writer Cameron Crowe and director Amy Heckerling have recently shared some little-known facts about the making the movie and one of them is that Sean Penn's Spicoli character saved the movie and lead to its success on home video. Another fact that was shared was that David Lynch was recommended to originally direct the comedy.

Heckerling and Crowe spoke to Variety about the making of the movie and some of the hardship that they faced. The studio didn't think that there was any money to be made from a movie about high school kids and thought that it was a complete waste of time. Fast Times at Ridgemont High initially only opened in just 200 theaters in the United States and
See full article at MovieWeb »

David Lynch Was Approached To Direct ‘Fast Times At Ridgemont High’

  • The Playlist
David Lynch Was Approached To Direct ‘Fast Times At Ridgemont High’
Early on in his career, it was more than evident that David Lynch had talent, but no one in the industry was quite sure what to do with him. George Lucas approached the director behind “Eraserhead” and “The Elephant Man” to helm “Star Wars: Episode VI – Return of the Jedi,” which Lynch turned down (he would scratch his blockbuster, sci-fi itch a year later with the infamous “Dune“).

Continue reading David Lynch Was Approached To Direct ‘Fast Times At Ridgemont High’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Fast Times’ at 35: Cameron Crowe, Amy Heckerling on Courting David Lynch, Sean Penn’s Method Acting, Genital Equality

‘Fast Times’ at 35: Cameron Crowe, Amy Heckerling on Courting David Lynch, Sean Penn’s Method Acting, Genital Equality
The seminal teen flick “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” is celebrating its 35th anniversary on Sunday.

Not only did the coming-of-age tale set in Southern California launch the careers of director Amy Heckerling and writer Cameron Crowe, the comedy catapulted Sean Penn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Phoebe Cates, and Judge Reinhold into stardom.

And in 2005, “Fast Times,” which was based on Crowe’s 1981 book chronicling his adventures going undercover at a San Diego high school, was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Ironically, “Fast Times” had to overcome many obstacles during production and almost failed to get released.

Among the early difficulties the production encountered was finding a director for the comedy, which also featured future best actor Oscar winners Forest Whitaker and Nicolas Cage — billed as Nicolas Coppola — as well as Eric Stoltz and Anthony Edwards.

Universal executive Thom Mount surprisingly recommended David Lynch, who
See full article at Variety - Film News »

What Happened? A Look At Several High Profile Films That Were Never Made!

(Aotn) Ever wonder what happened to several high profile projects that various well-known directors were said to be helming, but somehow have never seen the light of day? Many of these films were either “pet projects” for the directors or they ended up getting tied up in so many legal battles that eventually they were just scrapped or the director ended up simply walking away.

The wonderful folks over at IndieWire have complied a fantastic list compiling several of these films that have yet to see the light of day from directors such as Quentin Tarantino, Kathryn Bigelow, Christopher Nolan and more!

First up is director Christopher Nolan’s rumored Howard Hughes biopic. In several interviews Nolan called the script for the film “the best he had ever written”, in fact, the film was even picked by Castle Rock in 2002 and actor Jim Carrey was attached to star. So, just where did things go wrong?
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Relive the Year That Gave Us ‘Suspiria,’ ‘Saturday Night Fever,’ ‘Eraserhead,’ and More — Watch

  • Indiewire
Relive the Year That Gave Us ‘Suspiria,’ ‘Saturday Night Fever,’ ‘Eraserhead,’ and More — Watch
You’d be hard-pressed to find a more seminal year in movie-going history than 1977, which unspooled such game-changers and genre-benders as “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” “Saturday Night Fever,” “Airport ’77,” “Sorcerer,” and many, many more.

In honor of the fortieth anniversary of one of the wildest years in recent cinema history, The Film Society of Lincoln Center has programmed their ambitious ’77, a 33-film series surveying the sweeping cinematic landscape of a prolific year in cinema, in the United States and around the world.

Read MoreHow ‘Jaws’ Forever Changed the Modern Day Blockbuster — And What Today’s Examples Could Learn From It

While the debut of George Lucas’ original “Star Wars” is likely the most notable name in a long list of ’77 titles, the year also played home to “Jubilee,” “Eraserhead,” “Hausu,” “Wizard,” and “Smokey and the Bandit.” That startling breadth of film options speaks to the changing times — both
See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘The Night Of’ Became a Cinematic Quality Procedural and Hitchcockian Thriller

  • Indiewire
How ‘The Night Of’ Became a Cinematic Quality Procedural and Hitchcockian Thriller
Richard Price and Steven Zaillian’s “The Night Of” balanced cinematic production values with the miniseries capacity to dig deeper into details that are necessary for delivering the procedural goods.

The HBO miniseries was like “The Verdict” meets “Law and Order,” with its cultural and political overtones, exploring the ugliness of New York City’s criminal justice system, where it’s a matter of survival for everyone.

The Night Of” is also Hitchcockian in its destruction of innocence and freedom. What starts as a sexual fantasy for Pakistani-American college student Naz Khan (Riz Ahmed) – who picks up an alluring young woman, Andrea (Sofia Black-d’Elia), in his father’s cab – ends in a surreal nightmare when he wakes up and finds her brutally stabbed to death. Khan is an easy suspect for Detective Box (Bill Camp) and a gift for struggling attorney John Stone (Emmy-nominated John Turturro).

The Night Of
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Directed His Own Disturbing Version Of Kubrick’s ‘A Clockwork Orange’

‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Directed His Own Disturbing Version Of Kubrick’s ‘A Clockwork Orange’
Some of the most memorable scenes in “Twin Peaks: The Return” have found David Lynch revisiting the experimental highs of his most radical film work. Cooper’s strange trip in Episode 3 was a return to the sound and fury of “Eraserhead” and “Inland Empire,” while the sight of the camera looking down at Amanda Seyfried’s glowing Becky Burnett in Part 5 recalled the delirium of “Mulholland Drive.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Part 8 Was the Closest We’ll Come to Seeing David Lynch’s ‘Tree of Life’

But the series’ boldest moments have occurred when Lynch has infused his own dark style with the most iconic cinema ever made. That was certainly what happened in the legendary Part 8, in which the director channeled his inner Terrence Malick to tell the wordless origin story of evil (IndieWire called the scene “the closest we’ll ever come to seeing David Lynch’s
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Directed His Own Disturbing Version Of Kubrick’s ‘A Clockwork Orange’

  • Indiewire
‘Twin Peaks’: David Lynch Directed His Own Disturbing Version Of Kubrick’s ‘A Clockwork Orange’
Some of the most memorable scenes in “Twin Peaks: The Return” have found David Lynch revisiting the experimental highs of his most radical film work. Cooper’s strange trip in Episode 3 was a return to the sound and fury of “Eraserhead” and “Inland Empire,” while the sight of the camera looking down at Amanda Seyfried’s glowing Becky Burnett in Part 5 recalled the delirium of “Mulholland Drive.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Part 8 Was the Closest We’ll Come to Seeing David Lynch’s ‘Tree of Life’

But the series’ boldest moments have occurred when Lynch has infused his own dark style with the most iconic cinema ever made. That was certainly what happened in the legendary Part 8, in which the director channeled his inner Terrence Malick to tell the wordless origin story of evil (IndieWire called the scene “the closest we’ll ever come to seeing David Lynch’s
See full article at Indiewire »

David Lynch: The Art Life – portrait of the auteur as a young man

The maverick film director’s life story is less intriguing than his oeuvre might suggest

In this documentary about the maverick director of Eraserhead, Blue Velvet and Mulholland Drive, among others, the directors paint a portrait of David Lynch built on his background in visual art. Lynch’s story is told entirely in his own words, a voiceover made up of interviews alongside footage of him in his workshop, like a tiny figurine of a joker with a disembodied head that he moulds and paints himself. He speaks of the “huge worlds in these two blocks” that he grew up on and the first time he drove a car stoned, mesmerised by the freeway’s white lines. Fans will make connections with Lynch’s personal anecdotes and the images they know from his films, but watching the artist explain his work is never as interesting as the art itself.

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Lynch: The Art Life review – portrait of a film-maker like no other

This documentary traces Lynch’s early career as he moves from art into experimental film – earning the appalled disapproval of his father

Here is a portrait of the artist as a young man. With family photos and cine footage, David Lynch recalls his family background and the beginning of his career as an artist and painter, moving into experimental film. The documentary finishes with Lynch still only in his mid-20s, having landed a grant from the American Film Institute that allowed him to move to Los Angeles and labour for years on his early masterpiece, Eraserhead.

Lynch says that his work astonished and appalled his father, who told him never to have children and to give up art in favour of a proper office job. Lynch had grown up in Montana, Idaho and Virginia, the middle America he fetishised and ironised and exalted in his movie work, and he
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites