7.3/10
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60 user 21 critic

Nicholas and Alexandra (1971)

Tsar Nicholas II, the inept monarch of Russia, insensitive to the needs of his people, is overthrown and exiled to Siberia with his family.

Writers:

(book), (additional dialogue) | 1 more credit »
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Won 2 Oscars. Another 1 win & 11 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Roderic Noble ...
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Tegleva
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Nagorny
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Storyline

The tragic story of Nicholas II, the last Czar of Russia, set against the backdrop of the Russian Revolution. It is an inside look into the private lives of Nicholas and his wife Alexandra, their daughters, their only son and the painful secret about their son and heir apparent which bound the Imperial Couple to the mystical Rasputin, and the eventual execution of the entire family. Written by Gailene Va. Holley <gvah@lava.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

...is the story of the love that changed the world forever!


Certificate:

GP | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

| | |

Release Date:

13 December 1971 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Nicolás y Alejandra  »

Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(70 mm prints) (UK release)| (35 mm prints)

Color:

(Eastmancolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

George Stevens, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Anthony Harvey, and Charles Jarrott were all approached about directing, before Franklin J. Schaffner was finally signed. See more »

Goofs

As Nicholas signs his abdication papers it says "March 15" as he says "The Ides of March". apparently, Russia was still using the Alexander calender (which is 13 days behind the Georgian one) at this time, so it should read "March 2", as it read on the actual papers. See more »

Quotes

Rasputin: [to Alexandra] The child will die, if you don't get down on your knees and beg for his life.
See more »

Crazy Credits

"By courtesy of the National Theatre of G.B." is written underneath Tom Baker and Laurence Olivier's names in the end credits. "By courtesy of the Royal Shakespeare Company" is written underneath Janet Suzman's name. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Inside the Tower (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Russlan and Ludmila, Act II, Scene 3
(uncredited)
Music by Mikhail Glinka
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User Reviews

 
Dynasty - with a superior, intelligent script
5 July 2006 | by (Zurich, Switzerland) – See all my reviews

This truly beautiful movie with considerable artistic value should not be watched for its historical accuracy or its lack of geographical precision. It is mainly a story about a marriage of two weak but lovable people who somehow should not have been where fate put them. You could call Nicholas and Alexandra an anti-monarchistic manifesto.

The script really is first rate, it doesn't matter that all the characters are far more English than Russian, what counts is the way a tragic situation unfolds in front of the viewers. For many the last czar probably was a monster as he ordered the death of hundreds of thousands. Yet watching the movie you want to believe that he is the victim of circumstances, far removed from everyday life and a husband and father who cares deeply and, in spite of all his outrageous decisions and non-decisions, wants „to be good". Strange as it seems, but the intimate scenes between him and his wife are the highlights of the movie, as they really bring out the affection between two people who are attracted to each other although they are only too familiar with each other's flaws. It makes the tragic ending of the movie all the more sad.

I had the chance to visit Nicholas' palace in Yalta a few years back. It is full of family snapshots, as the czar was an avid photographer (and also movie maker). It is striking how modern those pictures are, how relaxed and „middle class" the imperial family, always in bathing suits or some elegant leisure wear, appears. In a strange way the Russian emperor comes through as being much less crusty than his contemporaries on the throne of Britain, Germany or Austria-Hungary. It gives you the idea that he was a modern man. Strangely, whenever he himself is in the photos, he is never in the center of the picture but always somewhere in a marginal position, seeming to be either bemused or slightly embarrassed. What a sad career!

An interesting side-effect of the movie is the fact that it shows that at the outset of World War I the crowned heads of Europe, many of them related to each other and on relatively intimate terms, could have prevented the bloodshed. They failed colossally and thus sealed the fate of a continent that still tries to find unity and a common denominator.


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