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Marat/Sade (1967)

Not Rated | | Drama, History, Music | 13 April 1967 (Sweden)
In an insane asylum, Marquis de Sade directs Jean Paul Marat's last days through a theater play. The actors are the patients.

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(play), (English translation by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Michael Williams ...
Herald
...
Monsieur Coulmier
...
...
Cucurucu
Hugh Sullivan ...
Kokol
...
Newly Rich Lady
...
A Mad Animal
...
Polpoch
Jeanette Landis ...
Rossignol
Robert Langdon Lloyd ...
Jacques Roux (as Robert Lloyd)
...
Monsieur Dupere
James Mellor ...
Schoolmaster
Henry Woolf ...
Father
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Storyline

July 13, 1808 at the Charenton Insane Asylum just outside Paris. The inmates of the asylum are mounting their latest theatrical production, written and produced by who is probably the most famous inmate of the facility, the Marquis de Sade. The asylum's director, M. Coulmier, a supporter of the current French regime led by Napoleon, encourages this artistic expression as therapy for the inmates, while providing the audience - the aristocracy - a sense that they are being progressive in inmate treatments. Coulmier as the master of ceremonies, his wife and daughter in special places of honor, and the cast, all of whom are performing the play in the asylum's bath house, are separated from the audience by prison bars. The play is a retelling of a period in the French Revolution culminating with the assassination exactly fifteen years earlier of revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat by peasant girl, Charlotte Corday. The play is to answer whether Marat was a friend or foe to the people of France. ... Written by Huggo

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Drama | History | Music

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

13 April 1967 (Sweden)  »

Also Known As:

A Perseguição e o Assassinato de Jean-Paul Marat Desempenhados Pelos Loucos do Asilo de Charenton Sob a Direção do Marquês de Sade  »

Company Credits

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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Charenton, the asylum depicted in the film, was established in 1645 and still exists and is still in use, although it is now called the Esquirol Hospital (l'Hôpital Esquirol), named for Jean-Étienne Dominique Esquirol, a French psychiatrist who ran the hospital in the 19th Century. See more »

Quotes

Marquis de Sade: Man has given a false importance to death. Any animal, man or plant that dies adds to Nature's compost heap becomes the manure without which nothing could grow, nothing could be created. Death is simply part of the process. Every death, even the cruellest death drowns in the total indifference of Nature. Nature would watch unmoved if we destroyed the entire human race. I hate Nature!
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Crazy Credits

The opening credits - the play's title, stage credits and the actors appearing in the film - pop on the screen, one word at a time, until it is filled. The closing credits - the film's production staff - start off with a full screen of words; they then pop off the screen, one word at a time, until it is completely empty...just as it was when the film began. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Asylum: Episode #1.4 (1996) See more »

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User Reviews

 
An Intellectual's Rocky Horror Picture Show
23 March 2002 | by (Fairbanks, Alaska) – See all my reviews

The film is essentially a filmed record of the live theatre production by the Royal Shakespeare Co. that toured to New York in the late 1960's and was filmed for Art House distribution by Universal.

This is one of my all-time favorite films because of the sheer density of meaning in it. The story is set in an asylum in 1808 in the Napoleonic era, and the play within it is set in 1793 during the most violent part of the French Revolutionary era. Most of the dialogue has relevance to political criticism in both eras. If that were not enough, it also has levels that are clearly evoking the era that the playwright Weiss was writing in (the 1960's) and also Germany's recent (Holocaust/WWII) past. Some passages in the play, most notably those relating to war, manage to have a level of meaning for ALL FOUR eras at once! Because I show this film to classes, I've seen it dozens of times and I'm continually intrigued by it because each viewing reveals new meanings as it seems to weirdly comment on the current day's events that occurred long after it was written and filmed. The first viewing is often disorienting because it piles so much historic-socio-sexual-political content up with so much odd directing and extreme acting style that it is hard to grasp at first, but repeated viewings suck you in like an intellectual's Rocky Horror Picture Show, and some theatre junkies learn to sing along.

The Film of the Royal Shakespeare Company production of Marat/Sade (1967) is considered a classic avant garde 1960's drama in the style known as "Theatre of Cruelty". It is often shown to university level theatre classes because it has wonderful examples of both Artaud and Brecht theatre styles in it. I show it to my classes and it never fails to blow their undergraduate minds. It stars Glenda Jackson as Charlotte Corday (now Dame Glenda Jackson, MP), Ian Richardson (of "House of Cards" fame) as Marat, and Patrick Magee (Clockwork Orange) as de Sade.

As the title implies, the film is entirely a play-within-a-play where most cast members depict both a character from the French Revolution as well as an insane asylum inmate playing that character. While the film (like the later comedy-drama about deSade, "Quills") addresses censorship, it is primarily concerned with a debate between Marat as a sort of representative of revolutionary radical communism, and de Sade as a nihilistic existentialist frustrated with his own, and society's, violently cruel urges, as well as the futility of revolutionary action to improve mankind.

Despite this very heavy and multi-layered topic, the film also manages to be both sexy and funny in regular intervals. Great moments include a comic "orgy" scene where the inmates sing "What's the point of a revolution without general copulation?" in a round like "row-row-row your boat" and mime a vigorously improbable group sex event fully clothed, Magee's various speeches on the nature of man: "What we do, is but a shadow of what we want to do...", Richardson's unblinking intensity as he waits for the knife to "kill" him, and Jackson, doing a little dance trying to capture the knife from de Sade while he teases her with it in an effort to get her in his arms. Add to this the delightful theatricality and musical numbers (yes there are many musical numbers!) and it is little wonder that the play on which the film is based has regularly been performed all around the world ever since it was written.


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