5.2/10
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6 user 12 critic

Code 7, Victim 5 (1964)

Victim Five (original title)
When a millionaires valet is murdered he hires a detective to discover by who and why his valet was killed, leading to connections of the nazi sort!

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Writers:

(screenplay), (original story) (as Peter Welbeck)
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Cast

Cast overview:
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...
...
Inspector Lean
...
Wexler
Dietmar Schönherr ...
Paul (as Dietmar Schonherr)
Gert van den Bergh ...
Vanberger
Howard Davis ...
Rawlings (as Howard Davies)
Percy Sieff ...
Anderson
...
Gina (as Veronique Vendell)
Gustel Gundelach ...
Hans Kramer
Sophia Kammara ...
Leila (as Sophia Spentzos)
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Storyline

When a millionaires valet is murdered he hires a detective to discover by who and why his valet was killed, leading to connections of the nazi sort!

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Every Crime Shapes Up Different...Every Clue Has Twists and Curves! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

10 July 1964 (West Germany)  »

Also Known As:

Code 7, Victim 5  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Lex Barker in unimaginative South African-set detective film
9 February 2006 | by See all my reviews

CODE 7, VICTIM 5 is now available in a cheap DVD, and for a few dollars (mine cost $3 US), it's passable entertainment, mostly for the presence of Lex Barker as private eye "Steve Martin" (same name as Raymond Burr's character in GODZILLA). This is a typical Harry Alan Towers production--find an out-of-the-way country where the pound/dollar goes a long way and without powerful unions, hire a lot of locals in small roles, use a lot of free locations to give the film "color," have Towers himself pen a by-the-numbers script over dinner or during a flight. South Africa photographs well (the film was shot by Nicholas Roeg, so it's no surprise), and is so unfamiliar to this American that the background almost becomes a character. The plot is the standard "someone is killing off one by one the members of a group from a previous time" and ex-Nazis are even dragged in. Ronald Fraser (best known in the USA for FATHOM, with Raquel Welch and the late great Tony Franciosa) does a good job as the local police inspector who finds jet-setting detective Barker to be a bit of a pest, but eventually realizes Barker's honesty and professionalism--Fraser and Barker are the perfect foils for each other. Nothing special here--probably of interest mostly to the Barker fan (or those who want a quick three-dollar travelogue of South Africa).


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