Indie News

GLAAD Media Awards: The Complete List of Nominees

GLAAD Media Awards: The Complete List of Nominees
As the nominations for the 29th annual GLAAD Media Awards were announced today, Battle of the Sexes, Call Me by Your Name, Lady Bird, Professor Marston and the Wonder Women. and The Shape of Water all scored nominations for Outstanding Film in Wide Release.

Claiming noms for Outstanding Film-Limited Release were BPM, A Fantastic Woman, God's Own Country, Thelma and The Wound.

In all, 125 nominees were announced in 21 English-language categories and another 16 in four Spanish-language categories.

Actress Trace Lysette (Transparent) and actor Wilson Cruz (Star Trek: Discovery) announced the nominees live on GLAAD's Facebook page from Park City,...
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Tamara Jenkins Delivers Infertility Dramedy ‘Private Life’ for Sundance Opening Night

Tamara Jenkins Delivers Infertility Dramedy ‘Private Life’ for Sundance Opening Night
Director Tamara Jenkins has always been interested in the family dynamic. The indie classic “Slums of Beverly Hills” was about failed upward mobility in the late 1970s. “The Savages” was about disinterested siblings who need to solve the problem of an ailing father.

After a ten-year break, Jenkins returned to open the 2018 Sundance Film Festival on Thursday night with “Private Life,” about a reproductively-challenged couple who need to start a family before they eviscerate the two-person unit they’ve already got.

Kathryn Hahn plays Rachel, a 41-year-old novelist who...
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Movie Poster of the Week: 60s Verité

  • MUBI
Above: French poster for Chronicle of a Summer (Jean Rouch & Edgar Morin, France, 1961). Design by Raymond Gid.There is an essential and vital film series opening today at Film Forum in New York: a survey of 1960s Cinema Verité productions which brings vividly to life a decade of instability and protest as well as a new era of introspection. While this survey of posters doesn’t give a complete look at the series—“more than 50 modern classics which not only changed the recording of social history, but revolutionized filmmaking itself”—since many of the films are not feature-length (some of the shows pair an hour long film with a 30 minute short) and thus were not theatrically released. But those that I’ve gathered do convey the urgency of the movement as well as its seat-of-the-pants guerrilla style of film marketing as much as film making.I’ve not included the
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Sundance Isn’t the Only Answer: Inside the Fight to Diversify America’s Movie Theaters

Sundance Isn’t the Only Answer: Inside the Fight to Diversify America’s Movie Theaters
The Sundance Film Festival often provides a window into the kind of movies that the industry wants to sustain, and the 2018 edition is no exception. From opening-night crowdpleaser “Blindspotting” to the police shooting drama “Monsters and Men” to the satiric “Sorry to Bother You,” the U.S. competition swells with stories featuring people of color. But the impulse to diversify current cinema goes beyond the movies. Though hard data is elusive, few will deny the dominance of one demographic at independent movie theaters around the county. Sundance titles lucky enough to land distribution in art houses invariably find themselves in front of predominantly older, white audiences.

The Art House Convergence is finally trying to do something about that. In the days leading up to Sundance, the annual gathering of the indie exhibition community met for its ninth edition in Midway, Utah, a half hour from Park City. This time, diversity
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‘Private Life’ Review: Paul Giamatti and Kathryn Hahn Are Brilliant in Tamara Jenkins’ Crushingly Honest Fertility Epic — Sundance 2018

‘Private Life’ Review: Paul Giamatti and Kathryn Hahn Are Brilliant in Tamara Jenkins’ Crushingly Honest Fertility Epic — Sundance 2018
A hilarious, profanely bougie, and crushingly honest story about a desperate couple trying something — anything — to have a baby before it’s too late, Tamara Jenkins’ first film since “The Savages” has been gestating for nine years, and it’s more than worth the wait.

Another acting showcase for a writer-director who’s previously mined new depths from talents like Philip Seymour Hoffman and Marisa Tomei, “Private Life” stars Paul Giamatti and Kathryn Hahn as Richard and Rachel Grimes, 47 and 41 respectively. They live on East 6th Street and Avenue A, they have two large dogs, and they’re as hyper-literary as you might expect a theater director and a playwright to be (but they’re not all Noah Baumbach about it). But all of those details — everything that makes them who they are — is subsumed into their seemingly endless quest for a child.

Read More:‘Blindspotting’ Review: Daveed Diggs Is
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“Modern-Day Slavery is Happening in our Neighborhood….”: Bernadett Tuza-Ritter on her Sundance Debut Feature, A Woman Captured

Making its U.S. premiere at Sundance in the World Cinema Documentary Competition, A Woman Captured is the remarkable debut feature doc from Hungarian filmmaker Bernadett Tuza-Ritter, who stumbled upon a horrifying story in her native country hidden in plain sight. Marish is a housekeeper in her early 50s, though her hard-knock life has aged her considerably). She has spent over a decade cooking, cleaning and serving, mostly as a human punching bag, both verbally and physically, to a mystery woman of indeterminate wealth who remains off-screen. That woman, Eta, who we hear but never see, has allowed Tuza-Ritter access to […]
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“The More I Embrace Chaos, the Better”: Director Narcissister | Narcissister Organ Player

As you made your film during the increasingly chaotic backdrop of the last year, how did you as a filmmaker control, ignore, give in to or, conversely, perhaps creatively exploit the wild and unpredictable? What roles did chaos and order play in your films? I have always employed and celebrated capital-c Chaos in my work, perhaps it’s a reflection of the world I find myself in, perhaps it’s a result of Chaos on many levels, both good and bad, being a constant in my family life. In specific terms, Chaos was my muse and my guide in the documenting of […]
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‘And Breathe Normally’ Clip: Cat Rescue Is Expensive [Sundance Exclusive]

Connections are found in the unlikeliest of places, and that’s the thematic thread the pulls together “And Breathe Normally.” The Icelandic feature makes its debut at the Sundance Film Festival, and today we’re excited to exclusively share a clip from the intriguing drama.

Written and directed by Ísold Uggadóttir, and starring Kristín Thóra Haraldsdóttir, Babetida Sadjo, and Patrik Nökkvi Pétursson, the story details the connection made between a refugee on her way to Canada, and a border patrol officer struggling to raise her young son on her own.

Continue reading ‘And Breathe Normally’ Clip: Cat Rescue Is Expensive [Sundance Exclusive] at The Playlist.
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Sundance Questions: Here’s What We’re Wondering as the 2018 Festival Begins — IndieWire’s Movie Podcast

The Sundance Film Festival kicks off the year with a whole bunch of questions about the marketplace for independent films. This year, there are all-new uncertainties about the biggest buyers and their motives in an environment where stories about late-night negotiations often overwhelm those about the movies themselves. So what happens to the smaller films when everyone’s so focused on the price tag? And which movies are really worthy of discussion, whether or not they find distribution in Park City?

Last year, the biggest buyers were Amazon (“The Big Sick”) and Netflix (“Mudbound”). But with reports that Amazon may scale back on independent film and growing concerns about Netflix’s disinterest in the theatrical business, what are the most viable options for Sundance films? That’s one of the burning questions pondered by Eric Kohn and Anne Thompson in this week’s episode of Screen Talk, as co-hosts Eric
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Paul Bettany May Play Prince Philip In ‘The Crown’ Seasons 3 & 4

The first two seasons of “The Crown” were not only terrific television, they provided a great platform for the cast, including breakout talents Claire Foy and Vanessa Kirby. We’re going to miss them as Peter Morgan and his team revamp the cast for the next two seasons, which will leap ahead a decade in the life of the royal family. However, the new cast is already shaping up to be pretty exciting.

Continue reading Paul Bettany May Play Prince Philip In ‘The Crown’ Seasons 3 & 4 at The Playlist.
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Sundance 2018: MoviePass Will Build Its Own Film Catalog Under MoviePass Ventures

Sundance 2018: MoviePass Will Build Its Own Film Catalog Under MoviePass Ventures
Aside from providing subscribers with cheap theater tickets, MoviePass will now partner with film distributors to offer its own catalogue of films, per Variety. The new undertaking, MoviePass Ventures, was announced this morning at the Sundance Film Festival.

Via MoviePass Ventures, DVD, on-demand, and streamable films will be available to those with a MoviePass subscription. MoviePass’ proposed distribution partners and the movies they would offer remain unknown. In Park City, MoviePass is in the midst of a day-long content series called “Off-Script: The Future of Film,” which includes panels with Lowe, Elijah Wood, plus Daniel Noah and Lisa Whalen, who produced Midnight selection “Mandy” starring Nicholas Cage.

“We aren’t here at Sundance to compete with distributors, but rather to put skin in the game alongside them and to bring great films to the big screen across the country for our subscribers,” said Ted Farnsworth, CEO of Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc,
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Michael Douglas Accused of Sexual Harassment by Journalist Susan Braudy

Michael Douglas Accused of Sexual Harassment by Journalist Susan Braudy
In an appearance on “The Today Show” Friday morning, journalist and author Susan Braudy says actor Michael Douglas “fondle[d] himself” in front of her without her consent during a work meeting in the 1980s. “He slid down to the floor, unbuckled his belt, and put his hand inside his trousers, and I could see what he was doing,” said Braudy. “Then he began to sort of fondle himself, and I was very scared.”

Braudy said Douglas repeatedly harassed her while she was employed by his company, Stone Bridge Productions. “He thought he was the king of the world, and that he could humiliate me without any repercussions.” She did not go to police at the time, said Braudy, because friends warned her not to speak out against the powerful man at the height of his career.

Earlier this month, Douglas tried to get ahead of the allegation, calling it “a complete lie” and and saying there is “no truth to it whatsoever” in an exclusive interview with Deadline. “I wonder if people realize when you do something like this, it hurts a lot more than just one person,” he added.

Watch Braudy’s first televised interview with NBC News correspondent Kate Snow below.

Sign Up:Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here. Related storiesHelen Mirren Says Men Exposed Themselves to Her 'Once a Week' When She Was in Her Teens and Early 20s -- WatchDylan Farrow Addresses Woody Allen in First TV Interview: 'Why Shouldn't I Want to Bring Him Down?'Ann Curry Breaks Silence on Matt Lauer: 'Verbal Sexual Harassment Was Pervasive' at NBC News
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"The X-Files," Season 11, Episode 3 Recap: Back To Our Bread And Butter

X-Files Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering Chris Carter's 10-episode continuation of the X-Files television series.To know someone intimately is to risk familiarity, and we all know what that breeds. Not that FBI Special Agents and ex-flames Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) and Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) are contemptuous of each other, exactly. Their disdain is more often directed inward, at those subconscious voices that dissuade and derail, reminding them that the clock (on both their work and on life itself) is always ticking. The duo's flirty, jargon-heavy banter is, beyond its innumerable surface pleasures (could any other pair so bewitchingly debate Gastaut-Geschwind syndrome?), a defense mechanism against the devils within and without. Find that one person who you can most easily converse with, whose sentences you don’t just finish but practically prophesy, and nothing can hold you back. That’s how it should ideally work,
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‘Sweet Country’ Trailer: Award Winning Aussie Western Tackles Racism

Sometimes deadlines get the best of us, and if we had a second crack at The Best Films Of 2018…We’ve Already Seen, “Sweet Country” would’ve certainly made the cut. The new film from Warwick Thornton picked up a slew of awards at film festivals throughout the past year, and we highly recommend this western, which crackles with racial tension.

Starring Sam Niell, Bryan Brown, Hamilton Morris, and Ewen Leslie, the film heads to Australia’s Northern Territory, where an Aboriginal man goes on the run after killing a white man.

Continue reading ‘Sweet Country’ Trailer: Award Winning Aussie Western Tackles Racism at The Playlist.
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‘Marvel’s Cloak & Dagger’ Trailer: Sparks Fly in Teen Superhero Romance From ‘Underground’ Creator

Marvel Comics continues to rule television as well as movies, with such hits as Hulu’s “Runaways,” FX’s “Legion,” and Netflix’s “Jessica Jones” earning critical praise and many fans. The latest Marvel-inspired show is heading to Freeform in June, this time adding a sweet teen romance spin to the superhero origin story. In this first preview, we can see “Cloak & Dagger” may be more than meets the eye.

Per the official synopsis: “‘Marvel’s Cloak & Dagger’ is the story of Tandy Bowen (Olivia Holt) and Tyrone Johnson (Aubrey Joseph) – two teenagers from very different backgrounds, who find themselves burdened and awakened to newly acquired superpowers which are mysteriously linked to one another. Tandy can emit light daggers and Tyrone has the ability to control the power of darkness. They quickly learn they are better together than apart.”

Read More:‘Black Widow’ Standalone Movie Finally Moving Forward
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‘The Guilty’ Clip & Poster: An Emergency Call Comes In [Sundance Exclusive]

While there are plenty of single location movies, the great ones make you forget that you’re just in one place. Gustav Möller‘s “The Guilty,” which makes its World Premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, aims to keep you on the edge of your seat, and make you forget that its ingenious concept involves nothing more than a dispatcher trying to solve a twisty mystery.

Starring Jakob Cedergren, Jessica Dinnage, Johan Olsen, and Omar Shargawi, the film follows police officer Asger Holm, who is demoted to desk work, and expects a sleepy beat as an emergency dispatcher.

Continue reading ‘The Guilty’ Clip & Poster: An Emergency Call Comes In [Sundance Exclusive] at The Playlist.
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Documentary Dp Tim Cragg on the Sensational Family Saga of Three Identical Strangers

Three men make a remarkable discovery in Three Identical Strangers, a new documentary premiering at Sundance from Tim Wardle. The men, all strangers, learn that they are in fact identical triplets separated at birth. Wardle chronicles this real-life saga through dramatizations from the ’70s and ’80s, present-day documentary footage and studio interviews. To shoot the film, Wardle hired Tim Cragg, a Dp with more than 40 credits as a documentary cinematographer. Cragg spoke with Filmmaker ahead of the film’s six screenings at Sundance about the challenges of filming Three Identical Strangers. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being […]
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‘Den Of Thieves’ Is A Bloated Heist Pic That Steals Your Precious Time [Review]

Every good heist abides by two golden rules: get in, and get out. The same logic applies to heist movies too. The quicker, sleeker and smoother you can be following through with your best laid plains, the better. The best pictures in the genre have an understanding of pace and structure, and are constantly moving forward. They’re not always short, but they always respect your patience. Ironically, what “Den of Thieves,” the directorial debut of screenwriter Christian Gudegast (“London Has Fallen“), steals most is your time.

Continue reading ‘Den Of Thieves’ Is A Bloated Heist Pic That Steals Your Precious Time [Review] at The Playlist.
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‘Super Troopers 2’ Nsfw Trailer: The Highway Patrol Goes To Canada, Eh?

Seventeen years ago, when I was a much younger person, I thought “Super Troopers” was pretty funny. I’m sure if I watched it now I’d have some nostalgic chuckles, but I’m not that misty-eyed for the comedy to really feel any excitement for the sequel. But for those who are ready to get back with the gang, it looks like that for better or worse, “Super Troopers 2” is bringing back the exact same brand of laughs you enjoyed all those years ago.

Continue reading ‘Super Troopers 2’ Nsfw Trailer: The Highway Patrol Goes To Canada, Eh? at The Playlist.
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Kamau Bilal on Serving as Director and Dp for Documentary Short Baby Brother

Missouri-based filmmaker Kamau Bilal chronicles his brother’s move back home to his parents’ house in Baby Brother, a documentary short that premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. A documentary Dp, editor and director, Bilal’s recent work includes shooting Abortion: Stories Women Tell for HBO. Below, Bilal discusses the traits of a “cinematic film,” the influence of Ramin Bahrani’s Chop Shop and his concerns on exploiting a documentary subject. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the cinematographer of your film? What were the factors and attributes that led to your being hired for this job? Bilal: For this film I operated […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »
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