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Edwards Pt 2: The Pink Panther Sequels and Famous Silent Film Era Step-grandfather Director

'The Pink Panther' with Peter Sellers: Blake Edwards' 1963 comedy hit and its many sequels revolve around one of the most iconic film characters of the 20th century: clueless, thick-accented Inspector Clouseau – in some quarters surely deemed politically incorrect, or 'insensitive,' despite the lack of brown face make-up à la Sellers' clueless Indian guest in Edwards' 'The Party.' 'The Pink Panther' movies [1] There were a total of eight big-screen Pink Panther movies co-written and directed by Blake Edwards, most of them starring Peter Sellers – even after his death in 1980. Edwards was also one of the producers of every (direct) Pink Panther sequel, from A Shot in the Dark to Curse of the Pink Panther. Despite its iconic lead character, the last three movies in the Pink Panther franchise were box office bombs. Two of these, The Trail of the Pink Panther and Curse of the Pink Panther, were co-written by Edwards' son,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

"Femme Fatales: Women In Espionage Films & Television, 1962-1973" By Tom Lisanti And Louis Paul, Revised And Updated Edition Now Available

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro columnist Tom Lisanti co-authored (with Louis Paul) the book "Femme Fatales: Women in Espionage Films and Television, 1962-1973" for McFarland publishers. The book has just been issued in a softcover edition, revised and updated. Here is Tom Lisanti's story behind the creation of the book.

It was a long time coming, fifteen years in fact, but McFarland and Company finally released a soft cover edition of the very popular and well-received Film Fatales: Women in Espionage Film & Television, 1962-1973 by Louis Paul and myself. The book profiles 107 dazzling women (Ursula Andress, Raquel Welch, Dahlia Lavi, Carol Lynley, Elke Sommer, and Sharon Tate, among them) who worked in the swinging sixties spy genre on the big and small screens. Some include interviews with these sexy spy gals. This new edition contains some profile revisions and updates and a few new photos.

The idea for this book was all Louis Paul’s.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

William Peter Blatty, The Exorcist Author, Passes Away at 89

William Peter Blatty, The Exorcist Author, Passes Away at 89
As the entertainment community comes off a year where seemingly countless legends passed away, 2017 isn't getting off to a great start on this front either. The Exorcist author William Peter Blatty has passed away at the age of 89. The news broke on Twitter this morning by The Exorcist director William Friedkin, although no cause of death has been given at this time. The director only shared that Blatty died yesterday, calling the writer a "dear friend and brother."

After news of his death broke, a number of entertainment and horror luminaries took to Twitter to pay tribute to the late author. Earlier this morning, tributes started pouring in from Stephen King, directors Edgar Wright and Joe Lynch, and Jeremy Slater, who created the The Exorcist TV series that debuted last fall on Fox. The late author celebrated his 89th birthday less than a week ago.

William Peter Blatty was born January 7, 1928 in New York City,
See full article at MovieWeb »

The 12 Best Movie Sequels Ever

  • Cinelinx
Movie sequels are big business for Hollywood. Many fans are getting burnt-out on sequels, especially since so many of them are unnecessary. Still, let’s not forget that when they’re done right, sequels can be great. Here are a dozen of the greatest sequels ever made.

12. Star Trek 2: The Wrath Of Khan (1982): Still the best of all the Star Trek films, this excellent sequel corrected everything that went wrong with its disappointing predecessor, Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The action, the humor and the character interactions were all excellent. The comparisons to Moby Dick gave it a literary flavor, and Ricardo Montalban was fantastic as the villain, Khan Noonien Singh. The death of Spock was a surprise to long-time fans, even if it didn’t last. This film made the Trek film franchise fun and set the standard for the future films.

11. The Color Of Money
See full article at Cinelinx »

Thomas' Popular TV Costar, Mother of Oscar-Nominated Actress Dead at 97

Marjorie Lord actress ca. early 1950s. Actress Marjorie Lord dead at 97: Best remembered for TV series 'Make Room for Daddy' Stage, film, and television actress Marjorie Lord, best remembered as Danny Thomas' second wife in Make Room for Daddy, died Nov. 28, '15, at her home in Beverly Hills. Lord (born Marjorie Wollenberg on July 26, 1918, in San Francisco) was 97. Marjorie Lord movies After moving with her family to New York, Marjorie Lord made her Broadway debut at age 17 in Zoe Akins' Pulitzer Prize-winning adaptation of Edith Wharton's novel The Old Maid (1935). Lord replaced Margaret Anderson in the role of Tina, played by Jane Bryan – as Bette Davis' out-of-wedlock daughter – in Warner Bros.' 1939 movie version directed by Edmund Goulding. Hollywood offers ensued, resulting in film appearances in a string of low-budget movies in the late 1930s and throughout much of the 1940s, initially (and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Satanic Sunday: Women Vs. the Devil

Most female characters in film succumb to the Devil. They are used as vessels or conduits for the Anti-Christ, lesser demons or the grandiose ideas of an occult. More often than not- they are chased, seduced or beaten into submission by satanic happenings. But some of these women do display degrees of ingenuity, agency, and physical prowess in their battle against coercion and the corruption of souls. Ranked from weakest characterization to strongest, the following list discusses the faculties that these women retain in the face of evil. (Minor spoilers ahead).

Lisa Reiner in Lisa and the Devil (1973)

Lisa (Elke Sommer) is overtaken by the spirit of a long deceased woman named Elena and the Devil all at once. Trapped deep in her mind, we hardly know Lisa outside of her light, carefree existence as an American tourist right before her possession. Purely a vessel for the malevolent temptation of
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Reboot of Classic Christie Mega-Bestseller to Be Directed by Oscar-Nominated Filmmaker

'And Then There Were None' movie with Barry Fitzgerald, Walter Huston, June Duprez, Louis Hayward and Roland Young. 'And Then There Were None' movie remake to be directed by Oscar nominee Morten Tyldum One of the best-known Agatha Christie novels, And Then There Were None will be getting another big-screen transfer. 20th Century Fox has acquired the movie rights to the literary suspense thriller first published in the U.K. (as Ten Little Niggers) in 1939. Morten Tyldum, this year's Best Director Academy Award nominee for The Imitation Game, is reportedly set to direct. The source for this story is Deadline.com, which adds that Tyldum himself “helped hone the pitch” for the acquisition while Eric Heisserer (A Nightmare on Elm Street 2010, The Thing 2011) will handle the screenplay adaptation. And Then There Were None is supposed to have sold more than 100 million copies worldwide, thus holding the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Christie's "None" Gets A New Film Adaptation

Still the best-selling novelist of all time with over two billion books sold (beaten only by the Bible and Shakespeare), Dame Agatha Christie's singularly most famous mystery is set to get another film adaptation.

"The Imitation Game" director Morten Tyldum has been hired to helm a new film version of "And Then There Were None" which 20th Century Fox has just acquired the feature film rights to.

Eric Heisserer ("The Thing," "Final Destination 5") has been hired to pen the script for the new version which Shawn Levy, Dan Levine, Dan Cohen and Hilary Strong will produce. The new one which reportedly boasts a "take that got the Christie estate excited."

The story follows ten strangers who are invited to an isolated island for a dinner party at the behest of a mysterious host. It's soon revealed they have been cut off from the mainland, and one of the
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Time Machine: Veterans Wallach and Coppola - Godfather 3 in Common - Are Special Oscar Honorees

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson on the Oscars' Red Carpet Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson at the Academy Awards Eli Wallach and wife Anne Jackson are seen above arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, held on Sunday, Feb. 27, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The 95-year-old Wallach had received an Honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards in November 2010. See also: "Doris Day Inexplicably Snubbed by Academy," "Maureen O'Hara Honorary Oscar," "Honorary Oscars: Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo Among Rare Women Recipients," and "Hayao Miyazaki Getting Honorary Oscar." Delayed film debut The Actors Studio-trained Eli Wallach was to have made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Academy Award-winning 1953 blockbuster From Here to Eternity. Ultimately, however, Frank Sinatra – then a has-been following a string of box office duds – was cast for a pittance, getting beaten to a pulp by a pre-stardom Ernest Borgnine. For his bloodied efforts, Sinatra went on
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

DVD Review: "The Prisoner Of Zenda" (1979) Starring Peter Sellers And Elke Sommer; Universal Vault DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Although he was regarded as a comedy genius, the sad truth is that Peter Sellers was more often than not misused in big screen comedies. After making it big on British TV  and in feature films in the late 1950s, Sellers became an international sensation with his acclaimed work in big studio feature films such as "Lolita", "Dr. Strangelove", "The World of Henry Orient" and the first entries in the "Pink Panther" series. Through the mid-Sixties, he did impressive work in films like "After the Fox", "The Wrong Box" and "What's New Pussycat?" If the films weren't classics, at least they presented some of Sellers' off-the-wall ability to deliver innovative characters and comedic situations. By the late Sixties, however, his own personal demons began to get the better of him. Sellers was the epitome of the classic clown: laughing on the outside but crying on the inside.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Satanic Sunday: Women Vs. the Devil

Most female characters in film succumb to the Devil. They are used as vessels or conduits for the Anti-Christ, lesser demons or the grandiose ideas of an occult. More often than not- they are chased, seduced or beaten into submission by satanic happenings. But some of these women do display degrees of ingenuity, agency and physical prowess in their battle against coercion and the corruption of souls. Ranked from weakest characterization to strongest, the following list discusses the faculties that these women retain in the face of evil. (Minor spoilers ahead).

Mario Bava’s “Lisa and the Devil

Lisa Reiner in Lisa and the Devil (1973)

Lisa (Elke Sommer) is overtaken by the spirit of a long deceased woman named Elena and the Devil all at once. Trapped deep in her mind, we hardly know Lisa outside of her light, carefree existence as an American tourist right before her possession. Purely
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Exploitation Alley: The House Of Exorcism (1974)!!!

Exploitation Alley: The House Of Exorcism

If 1970′s possession films aren’t your thing, they probably should be. Most of the time they can be downright creepy, often the right amount of cheese, and there’s always a chance that you might get surprised with random boobs for no reason at all. Actually, I’m pretty sure that I just explained the film I chose for this week’s Exploitation Alley. So if any of those elements sounded appealing at all (and hopefully they did), then you are ready for the infamous film, The House Of Exorcism!!!!

Released in 1973 and directed by Mario Bava (which you can totally tell if you have seen any of his other films), Lisa And The Devil was a commercial bust, leading the film to be somewhat taken over by Alfredo Leone (under the name of Mickey Lion), who then re-edited and reshot a huge
See full article at Icons of Fright »

"Spy Girls" Foto Files Issue #1 Now Shipping Worldwide!

  • CinemaRetro
A new concept in special issue publications from Cinema Retro!- Now shipping worldwide! Order this limited edition now!

Our new line of special issues is called Foto Files. The images are derived from the Cinema Retro archives.

Our premiere issue is dedicated to "Spy Girls" of the 1960s and 1970s. It's an 80-page magazine that emphasizes rare and exciting photographs of those actresses who were "deadlier than the male" in some of the best retro spy movies ever made!

Over 350 photos and film poster artwork from the era Limited print run. Not available in most retail outlets. All of your favorite femme fatales from such legendary series as James Bond, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., Harry Palmer, Bulldog Drummond, Matt Helm, Our Man Flint, and many others! Among the sex sirens featured in this remarkable collector's item issue: Ursula Andress, Diana Rigg, Elke Sommer, Caroline Munro, Camilla Sparv, Daliah Lavi,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Schell as Director: Three Academy Award Nominations for His Films

Maximilian Schell movie director (photo: Maximilian Schell and Maria Schell) (See previous post: “Maximilian Schell Dies: Best Actor Oscar Winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg.’”) Maximilian Schell’s first film as a director was the 1970 (dubbed) German-language release First Love / Erste Liebe, adapted from Igor Turgenev’s novella, and starring Englishman John Moulder-Brown, Frenchwoman Dominique Sanda, and Schell in this tale about a doomed love affair in Czarist Russia. Italian Valentina Cortese and British Marius Goring provided support. Directed by a former Best Actor Oscar winner, First Love, a movie that could just as easily have been dubbed into Swedish or Swahili (or English), ended up nominated for the Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award. Three years later, nominated in that same category was Schell’s second feature film as a director, The Pedestrian / Der Fußgänger, in which a car accident forces a German businessman to delve deep into his past.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Wamg Interview: ‘A Conversation With Edith Head’ at the Sheldon December 6th and 7th

A Conversation with Edith Head will be held at The Sheldon Ballroom in St. Louis on December 6th and 7th

All About Eve, Roman Holiday, The Ten Commandments, A Place In The Sun, The Sting. These great films and hundreds more have one thing in common: costume designer Edith Head (1897–1981). The small woman with the familiar straight bangs, black-rimmed saucer glasses, and unsmiling countenance racked up an unprecedented 35 Oscar nods and 400 film credits over the course of a sixty-year career. The golden age of Hollywood sparkled with extravagant cinematic productions and stars such as Bette Davis, Elizabeth Taylor, Natalie Wood, Mae West, Cary Grant, Audrey Hepburn, Grace Kelly, Barbara Stanwyck, and Robert Redford were made even more glamorous by donning the costumes designed by incredibly talented Ms Head.

Theater director Susan Claassen, a New Jersey native got the idea for a project based on Edith Head several years ago after
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Wamg Interview – Susan Claassen: A Conversation with Edith Head – Sliff 2013

All About Eve, Roman Holiday, The Ten Commandments, A Place In The Sun, The Sting. These great films and hundreds more have one thing in common: costume designer Edith Head (1897–1981). The small woman with the familiar straight bangs, black-rimmed saucer glasses, and unsmiling countenance racked up an unprecedented 35 Oscar nods and 400 film credits over the course of a sixty-year career. The golden age of Hollywood sparkled with extravagant cinematic productions and stars such as Bette Davis, Elizabeth Taylor, Natalie Wood, Mae West, Cary Grant, Audrey Hepburn, Grace Kelly, Barbara Stanwyck, and Robert Redford were made even more glamorous by donning the costumes designed by the incredibly talented Mrs. Head.

Theater director Susan Claassen, a New Jersey native, got the idea for a project based on Edith Head several years ago after she watched a televised biography of the designer. She realized that her physical resemblance to the designer was uncanny,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Two Must-See Disasters as Parker Series Continues (She Turns 91 in Two Days)

Eleanor Parker 2013 movie series continues today (photo: Eleanor Parker in Detective Story) Palm Springs resident Eleanor Parker is Turner Classic Movies’ Star of the Month of June 2013. Thus, eight more Eleanor Parker movies will be shown this evening on TCM. Parker turns 91 on Wednesday, June 26. (See also: “Eleanor Parker Today.”) Eleanor Parker received her second Best Actress Academy Award nomination for William Wyler’s crime drama Detective Story (1951). The movie itself feels dated, partly because of several melodramatic plot developments, and partly because of Kirk Douglas’ excessive theatricality as the detective whose story is told. Parker, however, is excellent as Douglas’ wife, though her role is subordinate to his. Just about as good is Best Supporting Actress Oscar nominee Lee Grant, whose career would be derailed by the anti-Red hysteria of the ’50s. Grant would make her comeback in the ’70s, eventually winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Blu-ray Review - Baron Blood (1972)

Baron Blood (Italian: Gli orrori del castello di Norimberga), 1972.

Directed by Mario Bava

Starring Joseph Cotten, Elke Sommer, Antonio Cantafora, Massimo Girotti and Rada Rassimov.

Synopsis:

Newly graduated Peter travels to Vienna to explore his Austrian heritage. There he visits the castle of an ancestor, the murderous Baron Otto von Kleist. While playfully flirting with a new acquaintance, Peter reads aloud an incantation causing the Baron - and the killing - to return...

Often credited with instigating the modern Italian Giallo movement, especially films belonging to that sub-genre that have a heavy supernatural element, Bava's best known work (Black Sunday, Black Sabbath, The Evil Eye) hails from the heady gothic horror of the 1960's. Later work, such as Baron Blood, has often been overlooked.

This is something of a shame, as it contains plenty to recommend it to fans of European Horror, particularly those that are keen to make the
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Baron Blood’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Joseph Cotten, Elke Sommer, Massimo Girotti, Rada Rassimov, Antonio Cantafora, Umberto Raho, Luciano Pigozzi | Written by Vincent Fotre | Directed by Mario Bava

Italian director Mario Bava was responsible for some truly great horror movies of the 60s and 70s, including The Mask of Satan, Black Sabbath, Blood and Black Lace, Lisa and the Devil and proto-slasher A Bay of Blood. However some, whilst a success at the time, haven’t aged quite so well… like Baron Blood.

The film is yet another gothic horror from Bava that, like Black Sunday before it, features a witch’s curse – this time placed on Baron Otto von Kleist, Austria’s legendarily murderous ‘Baron Blood’, whose corpse is inadvertently revived when an ancient incantation is read out as a joke by a descendant and his girlfriend. Naturally, the Baron decides to carry on where he originally left off, with the help of an
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Blu-ray Review: Lisa and the Devil

Lisa And The Devil

Stars: Elke Sommer, Telly Savalas, Sylva Koscina, Alessio Orano, Gabriele Tinti, Kathy Leone, Eduardo Fajardo, Franz von Treuberg, Espartaco Santoni, Alida Valli | Written and Directed by Mario Bava

When it comes to Italian horror it’s fair to say that Mario Bava is one of the most known names. A visionary director he’s brought us the likes of Black Sunday and not only paved the way for the success of Italian horror but also brought us some truly unique films, one of them being Lisa and the Devil. Now that Arrow Video have brought this classic directors cut to Blu-ray along with the alternative version House of Exorcism we can see what his original vision was and why in my view it’s one of his best pieces of work.

When holidaying in Spain, Lisa is shown a painting said to be of the devil,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »
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