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San Sebastian Film Review: ‘Pororoca’

San Sebastian Film Review: ‘Pororoca’
The Pororoca, for those not up to speed on their Amazonian geography, is a vast tidal bore that can travel up to 500 miles inland on the great South American river, its waves gathering considerable height and momentum as they move upstream. That might seem an extraneous fact, given that the eponymous natural phenomenon is neither featured nor mentioned at any point in Romanian director Constantin Popescu’s cryptically titled third feature — but “Pororoca” is a simmering, gradually harrowing film heavy on incidental information at the frayed edges of its drama. It’s for viewers to figure out how things fit, or don’t, into its shattered portrait of a family man undone by his daughter’s unexplained disappearance, as his rage and grief accumulate their own destructive tidal force. The Romanian New Wave has never seemed quite so bluntly apt a term.

Premiering in competition at San Sebastian, this is muscular hard-art fare that, with
See full article at Variety - Film News »

San Sebastian Film Review: ‘Mademoiselle Paradis’

San Sebastian Film Review: ‘Mademoiselle Paradis’
It’s the kind of teasing what-if with which we begin torturing ourselves as children: If you had to choose one, would you rather be deaf or blind? Would you rather have the gift of sight for a brief time only to have it taken away, or never know exactly what you’re missing? And if regaining your vision meant losing your most unique talent, would you take that trade? For blind Austrian pianist Maria Theresia “Resi” Paradis, the latter wasn’t a hypothesis or a choice, but a perverse quandary into which her body threw her — not that the draconian patriarchy of the late 18th century would have permitted her much say either way. A fresh, inquisitive portrait of her pivotal teenage years from director Barbara Albert, “Mademoiselle Paradis” is less interested in its subject’s potted biography than in how her era’s vicious politics of class and gender affected her plight. The
See full article at Variety - Film News »

New to Streaming: ‘The Big Sick,’ ‘Paris Can Wait,’ ‘Harmonium,’ ‘Lost in Paris,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Big Sick (Michael Showalter)

From start to finish, The Big Sick, directed by Michael Showalter, works as a lovingly-rendered, cinematic answer to the dinner party question: “So how did you two meet?” Based on comedian Kumail Nanjiani‘s real life (he co-wrote the screenplay with his wife Emily V. Gordon), we meet Kumail (Nanjiani) as he finishes a stand-up set in Chicago. He becomes fast friends with a
See full article at The Film Stage »

Venice Film Review: ‘Invisible’

Venice Film Review: ‘Invisible’
Ely, the unhappily pregnant, perpetually sidelined 17-year-old heroine of “Invisible,” may not quite live up to the title’s description just yet, but you sense she’s heartbreakingly close to slipping from the world’s view. That danger makes Argentinian director Pablo Giorgelli’s sympathetic camera cling all the more insistently to her in this no-frills, no-tricks, no-mercy exercise in close-up social realism: Played with marked insight and silent resilience by Mora Arenillas, she’s in practically every frame of the film, her subtle expressive range tested and expanded with every emotional trial thrown at her character.

For Giorgelli, who swept an armful of major festival prizes including the Cannes Camera d’Or for his minimalist 2011 debut “Las Acacias,” his follow-up’s similarly spartan humanism doesn’t represent a significant step forward, but it’s accomplished and affecting on its contained terms. With its bleaker psychological outlook and more overcast visual style, “Invisible
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in September 2017

  • Indiewire
The 7 Best Movies Coming to Netflix in September 2017
August is finally over, the summer movie season is in the rear-view mirror, and we’re entering that magical time of year when the studios actually care about the quality of the films they put out into the world. Netflix, always eager to provide the public with a good reason to stay home, is responding to the sudden uptick in must-see Hollywood fare by busting out the big guns and releasing an absolutely killer line-up of modern classics (click here for the complete list).

From the defining indie of the 21st century to the greatest romance of the 21st, these are the seven best films that are coming to Netflix in September.

Read More:7 New Netflix Shows to Binge in September 2017, and The Best Episodes of Each 7. “Vincent N Roxxy” (2016)

Unfolding like a Nicholas Winding Refn-directed remake of “Shotgun Stories,” Gary Michael Schultz’s “Vincent N Roxxy” is a nasty
See full article at Indiewire »

'Meda or the Not So Bright Side of Things': Film Review | Sarajevo 2017

'Meda or the Not So Bright Side of Things': Film Review | Sarajevo 2017
Making the switch from actor to director, Emanuel Parvu has struck it lucky with his debut feature. An emotionally knotty slice of downbeat social realism set in a remote wooded corner of contemporary Romania, Meda or the Not So Bright Side of Things won the top awards for best director and best actor at the Sarajevo Film Festival last week.

A regular screen presence in his native Romania, Parvu recently appeared in Cristian Mungiu’s Cannes prize winner Graduation, though his credits also include trashy Steven Seagal and Jean-Claude Van Damme action thrillers. For his lean but cumbersomely titled debut, he...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Turkey’s Newest: ‘Grain’ in Competition at Sarajevo Film Festival

Turkey’s Newest: ‘Grain’ in Competition at Sarajevo Film Festival
Academy Nominated and Berlin Golden Bear Winner (Bal/ Honey), Director Semih Kaplanoğlu’s new feature, Grain (Isa: The Match Factory), starring Cristina Flutur, Jean-Marc Barr and Ermin Bravo will have its world premiere in the competition program at the Sarajevo Film Festival August 11–18.

Watch the trailer here.

Besides the screening of Grain costarring Ermin Bravo, Bravo is also starring in another screening at the Sarajevo Film Festival, Men Don’t Cry, directed by Alen Drljevic. This film won just the Special Jury Prize at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.

Sarajevo Film Festival Competition Red CarpetErmin Bravo

Watch the trailer of Men Don’t Cry here.

Jean-Marc Barr is known for Lars van Trier’s films Dogville, Breaking the Waves, Nymphomaniac, and Europa. He has also just finished shooting for Cellar, directed by Igor Voloshin.

Jean-Marc Barr

Cristina Flutur is best-known for playing Alina in the movie Beyond the Hills (2012), directed
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Chile’s Growing Film Festival Scene: Sanfic Announces Lineup

Chile’s Growing Film Festival Scene: Sanfic Announces Lineup
The thirteenth edition of Santiago International Film Festival, Sanfic (August 20–27, 2017), the largest film festival in Chile, will present more than 100 international and Chilean films, including productions shown and awarded in festivals such as Cannes, Berlin and Venice. Among the feature films will be 7 world and 14 Latin American premieres.

Sanfic (Santiago International Film Festival) is opening the festival to international press this year with Variety Dailies and important international guests for their Sanfic Industry section. Guest attending include Kim Yutani (Sundance programmer), Javier Martin (Berlinale delegate), Molly O ́Keefe (Tribeca Film Institute — fiction features) and Estrella Araiza (Industry director of Guadalajara Iff), to name a few. Matt Dillon is its special guest along with the renowned director of photography Rainer Klausmann.

The Summit starring Ricardo Darín, Dolores Fonzi and Erica Rivas, with an appearance of Christian Slater and renowned Chilean actors Paulina Garcia and Alfredo Castro

The opening film of the
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Stripping Down Deceptions: Radu Jude and "The Dead Nation"

  • MUBI
A few years after the beginning of what has been labeled the "New Romanian Cinema" the aesthetic and moral agenda of filmmakers working under this banner threatened to become a mere cliché. Too often corruption was filmed with static long shots, too many colors vanished from the images and too much emphasis was placed on the same actors acting in similar roles. The director Radu Jude, who worked as an assistant for Cristi Puiu on the movement's seminal The Death of Mr. Lazarescu (2005), made some strong short films like Shadow of a Cloud (2013), none of which insinuated that he would be the one taking the (not only social) realism of Cristi Puiu, Corneliu Porumboiu, Cristian Mungiu and friends to a new level. His latest documentary The Dead Nation shows a filmmaker who has discovered a special way of looking at and behind images. That alone does not qualify for a different approach in Romanian cinema,
See full article at MUBI »

Karlovy Vary Review: ‘Breaking News’

Karlovy Vary Review: ‘Breaking News’
A compellingly well-made if minor addition to a major canon, Romanian director Iulia Rugină’s “Breaking News” bears many of the impressive hallmarks of her nation’s New Wave: emotional maturity; a restrained, naturalistic performance and shooting style; and an eye for the intimate moral conundrum that comments on a broader sphere of experience. But its conclusion lacks the devastating precision attack of the movement’s greatest works, as well as a sense, most recently felt in Cristian Mungiu’s “Graduation,” of allegorical importance: the feeling that the ripples and quakes of the story are only the most visible effects of tectonic plates of social anxiety shifting far below. Instead of sharpening the focus as the film progresses, Rugină, who enjoyed considerable commercial success at home with 2013’s “Love Building” and its 2014 sequel, gradually loosens her grip on the narrative after a tightly coiled set-up. The resulting diffusion may be true to the messiness and irresolution of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Shanghai fest awards top prizes to 'Pedicab', 'Shuttle Life'

  • ScreenDaily
Shanghai fest awards top prizes to 'Pedicab', 'Shuttle Life'
Jury headed by Cristian Mungiu selects winners.

Pedicab, directed by the Philippines’ Paolo Villaluna, won best film at the Shanghai International Film Festival’s Golden Goblet awards on Sunday night.

The film (pictured) follows a diverse group of people travelling by pedicab from Manila to the perceived paradise of their home province.

The Golden Goblets jury, headed by Cristian Mungiu, awarded the grand jury prize to Yellow, from Iranian filmmaker Mostafa Taghizad’h, which also picked up best actress for Sareh Bayat’s performance.

Best director went to Polish filmmaker Maciej Pieprzyca for I Am A Killer, while China’s Huang Bo won best actor for his role in Cai Shang-jun’s The Conformist. Russian director Ivan Bolotnikov’s Kharms was awarded best screenplay (Bolotnikov) and best DoP (Sandor Berkeshi).

Romania’s Fault Condition won the award for Outstanding Artistic Achievement, while best documentary went to Germany’s When Paul Came Over The Sea – Journal Of An Encounter
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Shanghai Film Festival Awards: 'Pedicab' Wins Best Film, 'Loving Vincent' Takes Animation Honor

Shanghai Film Festival Awards: 'Pedicab' Wins Best Film, 'Loving Vincent' Takes Animation Honor
The Philippine film Pedicab, directed by Paolo Villaluna, won the 20th Shanghai International Film Festival's Golden Goblet Award for best feature film Sunday.

Palme d'Or-winning Romanian filmmaker Cristian Mungiu presided over the jury that selected the competition winners at the leading Chinese cinema event this year.

"For the humanism and universality of the story, for the simplicity of the style and realization — for the non-conformism with which it represented our desire to believe that there is a sense in this universe, the award for the best film goes to Pedicab, from the Philippines," Mungiu said as he called Villaluna...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/).
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Rare Cannes Swedish Favorite, AIDS Drama and Best Actor Winner Phoenix Oscar Chances?

Palme d'Or winner 'The Square' with Claes Bang: 'Gobsmackingly weird' Cannes Film Festival favorite may have a tough time landing a Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award nomination. Ruben Östlund's comedy-drama is totally unrelated to Jehane Noujaim's 2013 Oscar-nominated political documentary of the same title, which refers to downtown Cairo's Tahrir Square. Cannes' Palme d'Or winner 'The Square' & other Official Competition favorites' Oscar chances Screenwriter-director Ruben Östlund's The Square was the Palme d'Or winner at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival, which wrapped up on May 28. (See list of Palme d'Or and other 2017 Cannes winners further below.) Clocking in at about 2 hours and 20 minutes, Östlund's unusual comedy-drama revolving around the chaotic p.r. campaign to promote the opening of the titular installation – a symbolic square of light – at a contemporary art museum in Stockholm has been generally well-received by critics. In the opinion of The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'The Chinese Widow' to replace 'Our Time Will Come' as Siff opener

  • ScreenDaily
'The Chinese Widow' to replace 'Our Time Will Come' as Siff opener
No reason has been given for the change in opening film.

Danish director Bille August’s The Chinese Widow will open this year’s Shanghai International Film Festival (Siff, June 17-26), replacing Ann Hui’s Our Time Will Come, which was previously announced as the opening film.

However, Our Time Will Come will still play in the Golden Goblet competition at Siff. No reason was given for the change by either the festival or the film’s producer Bona Film Group.

Both films are set in China during the Second World War. Starring Emile Hirsch and Yu Nan, The Chinese Widow tells the story of an American pilot who is shot down and saved by Chinese villagers. It remains unclear if the film has been made under the recently signed Danish-Chinese co-production treaty. August recently served as jury president at the Beijing International Film Festival.

Our Time Will Come, which stars Zhou Xun and Eddie Peng, revolves
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

Cannes Ends with…Awards — 3rd of 3

The heightened security with machine gun armed soldiers and policemen constantly patrolling was intensified after the Manchester Massacre. With a pall over the festival, one minute of silence was observed for the 22 murdered and flags hung at half-mast. In addition to that, the sudden death at 57 of the Busan Film Festival deputy director Kim Ji-seok and that of the James Bond star Roger Moore brought the film world into a new perspective as we join the larger world to face the random indications of human mortality. High security vs. cinema as a sanctuary of freedom is highlighted this year like no other time that I can recall in my 31 years here.President of the jury, Pedro Almodovar

But life does go on, the jury judges, the stars get press attention on the red carpet and the rest of us continue to wait patiently in
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or

Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or
Cannes — The 70th anniversary Cannes Film Festival has wrapped, culminating with an unconventional awards ceremony in which Pedro Almodóvar and his jury bestowed a couple unexpected bonus prizes, including a tie for screenplay and a special award to Nicole Kidman, who appeared in four projects in this year’s official selection, including competition titles “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and “The Beguiled,” season two of “Top of the Lake” and special screening “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Meanwhile, the fabled Palme d’Or went to Swedish director Ruben Östlund’s cutting art-world (and real-world) satire “The Square,” which dares to bring aspects of conceptual and performance art into the sphere of cinema. The choice came as something of a surprise, if only because the masterful, 142-minute film has divided audiences so far, and jury prizes rely on consensus.

Östlund’s follow-up to Un Certain Regard winner “Force Majeure,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes: Insas Student Valentina Maurel’s ‘Paul Is Here’ Wins Cannes Cinefondation

Cannes — “Paul Is Here,” from Costa Rica’s Valentina Maurel, a student at Belgium’s Institut National Supérieur des Arts du Spectacle et des Techniques de Diffusion (Insas), snagged the First Jury Prize Friday at Cannes Cinefondation on Friday.

Crucially, the First Jury Prize guarantees Maurel presentation of her first feature at the Cannes Festival – a large leg-up when it comes to getting that film made.

The prize was awarded by a jury headed by Romanian 2007 Cannes Palme d’Or winner Cristian Mungiu (“4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days”). Also on the jury: French actress Clotilde Hesme (“Chocolat”), Greek director Athina Rachel Tsangari (“Chevalier”), “Moonlight’s” Barry Jenkins and pioneering Singaporean helmer Eric Khoo (“In the Room”).

“A study of a relationship in crisis, which has complications, which I hope will touch spectators,” Maurel said. her short turns on a girl whose life is turned upside down by the return of Paul. an old flame,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes 2017 Cinéfondation winners revealed

  • ScreenDaily
Cristian Mungiu lead the jury at the 70th edition of the festival.

The winners of the 20th Cinéfondation Selection at the Cannes Film Festival have been announced.

The Cinéfondation Selection consisted of 16 student films, chosen out of 2 600 entries coming from 626 film schools around the world.

Romanian director Cristian Mungiu was president of the Jury that also included Clotilde Hesme, Athina Rachel Tsangari, Barry Jenkins and Eric Khoo.

They handed out the prizes during a ceremony held in the Buñuel Theatre, followed by the screening of the winning films, which were:

First Prize:

Paul Est LÀ (Paul Is Here)

Directed by Valentina Maurel

Insas, Belgium

Second Prize:

Heyvan (AniMal)

Directed by Bahram & Bahman Ark

Iranian National School of Cinema, Iran

Third Prize:

Deux ÉGARÉS Sont Morts (Two Youths Died)

Directed by Tommaso Usberti

La Fémis, France

The Cinéfondation allocates a €15,000 grant for the First Prize, €11,250 for the Second and €7,500 for the Third.

The winner
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Award Winners Announced in Cinéfondation Selection of Student Films

  • Indiewire
Cannes Award Winners Announced in Cinéfondation Selection of Student Films
Read More: Cannes Critics Week Awards: ‘Makala,’ ‘Gabriel and the Mountain’ Take Top Honors

The Cinéfondation and Short Films Jury headed by Cristian Mungiu and including Clotilde Hesme, Athina Rachel Tsangari, Barry Jenkins and Eric Khoo has awarded the 2017 Cinéfondation Prizes during a ceremony held in the Buñuel Theatre, followed by the screening of the winning films. The winners are:

First Prize

“Paul Est Là” (“Paul Is Here”)

Directed by Valentina Maurel

The Institut National Supérieur des Arts du Spectacle (Insas), Belgium

Second Prize

“Heyvan” (“Animal”)

Directed by Bahram Ark and Bahman Ark

Iranian National School of Cinema, Iran

Third Prize

Deux Égarés Sont Morts” (“Two Youths Died”)

Directed by Tommaso Usberti

La Fémis, France

The Cinéfondation allocates a €15,000 grant for the first prize, €11,250 for the second and €7,500 for the third. The winner of the first prize is also guaranteed the presentation of his or her first feature film at the Cannes Film Festival.
See full article at Indiewire »
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